Introducing the Gizmag Store

Retina

The second iPad Mini gets its first 'Retina Display'

As expected, Apple unveiled a new iPad Mini with an improved display upgraded to "retina" status, and a complement of new colored covers and cases for both the smaller slate and the new iPad Air.  Read More

We take a look at how Toshiba's KIRAbook and Apple's 13-inch MacBook Pro with Retina displ...

Last week, Toshiba entered the ultra high-end laptop market with the KIRAbook, a thin and light Ultrabook with a number of compelling features. The laptop is the first Windows 8 device to feature a Retina-level display (or PixelPure as Toshiba calls it), throwing it into direct competition with Apple's MacBook Pro with Retina display. We take a look at both devices to see which (if either) comes out on top.  Read More

The basic components of the Argus II Retinal Prosthesis, used in the experiment

Second Sight’s Argus II Retinal Prosthesis is definitely an interesting piece of technology, allowing a blind user to “see” objects, colors and movement in their environment. Ordinarily, this is done with the help of a video-camera-equipped pair of glasses worn by the user. In a recent experiment, however, researchers bypassed the camera, transmitting visual braille patterns directly to a blind test subject’s retina.  Read More

Researchers have reportedly restored near-normal vision to blind mice, using a prosthesis ...

Retinal prostheses such as the Argus II, Bio-Retina and the Retina Implant AG microchip all work – more or less – by stimulating the retina’s ganglion cells with light-induced electrical signals. The images produced in the patient’s visual cortex tend to be quite rudimentary, however. This is partially because the rate at which the signals are sent isn’t the same as the rate of neural impulses normally produced by a retina. Now, researchers have deciphered the neural code used by mouse ganglion cells, and used it to create a prosthesis that reportedly restores normal vision to blind mice. They have additionally deciphered the neural code of monkeys, which is close to that used by humans, so a device for use by blind people could also be on the way.  Read More

Retinal implant with power cable (Image: Retinal Implant AG)

Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a degenerative eye disease that affects 200,000 people in the United States and Europe and has left 15 million people permanently blind worldwide. German biotechnology firm Retina Implant AG has developed a microchip that provides a useful degree of artificial vision in patients who have been blind for even long periods. The 3 x 3 mm (0.118 in) chip is implanted below the surface of the retina where it electrically stimulates the optical tissues. After successful clinical trials in Germany, the chip is now being tested in Hong Kong and Britain before moving on to planned trials in the U.S.  Read More

Drawing of a Bio-Retina being inserted into an eye and affixed to the AMD damaged retina b...

At least 25-30 million people worldwide have age-related macular degeneration (AMD), one of the leading causes of blindness in middle-aged and older adults. The Israeli start-up Nano Retina has announced their new Bio-Retina, a tiny array of photodetectors which can be implanted directly on the retinal surface. Ready to enter clinical trials in 2013, the Bio-Retina restores vision to AMD sufferers almost immediately following the simple implantation process.  Read More

LG's five-inch LCD display can handle full 1080p HD video

LG has introduced an impressive new smartphone display that's expected to come to new handsets in the second half of 2012. The panel is five inches across, and features a pixel density of 440ppi with an aspect ratio of 16:9, capable of displaying 1080p HD content. This impressive new display trumps Apple's retina display, as well as the larger screens on phones like the Galaxy Note in terms of size versus pixel density.  Read More

A new retinal prosthesis could allow the blind to see, by using pulses of near-infrared li...

Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in North America, while retinitis pigmentosa causes approximately 1.5 million people worldwide to lose their sight every year. Individuals afflicted with retinal degenerative diseases such as these might someday be able to see again, however, thanks to a device being developed at California’s Stanford University. Scientists there are working on a retinal prosthesis, that uses what could almost be described as miniature solar panels to turn light signals into nerve impulses.  Read More

Physicians at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have succeeded in growing human retinal ...

Among the primary causes of adult-onset blindness are degenerative diseases of the retina, such as macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. While some treatments have been developed that slow down the rate of degeneration, the clinical situation is still generally unsatisfactory. But if you could grow a new retina, transplant might be a possible cure. Now new hope is springing up from a research project at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in which scientists have succeeded in growing human retinal tissue from stem cells.  Read More

Apple sent out invites today to an event next Wednesday at the Yerba Buena Center for the ...

A new iPad is on the horizon. Apple sent out invites today to an event next Wednesday at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco, where it promises to “have something you really have to see. And touch.” The event is set to go down at 10am, and is widely speculated to be the announcement of the iPad 3. The tablet is widely rumored to have an updated 2048x1536 “Retina” display, faster processor, LTE, and an 8-megapixel camera.  Read More

Looking for something? Search our 26,500 articles