Advertisement

Repair

Bicycles

Repair Rebel packs 24 tools into one ring

Last month, we heard about a quirky little multi-tool known as the Ringtool. True to its name, it’s ring-shaped, and features nine tool bits built into its outside edge (it also has a bottle opener in the middle). While it’s proven fairly popular in its Kickstarter campaign, some people just might not be satisfied with 10 tools. If you’re one of those people, you might prefer the circular 24-tool Repair Rebel. Read More

Electronics

Hand-held "sound camera" shows you the source of noises

If you work with machinery, engines or appliances of any type, then you’ve likely experienced the frustration of hearing a troublesome noise coming from somewhere, but not being able to pinpoint where. If only you could just grab a camera, and take a picture that showed you the noise’s location. Well, soon you should be able to do so, as that’s just what the SeeSV-S205 sound camera does. Read More

Bicycles

Cycling multi-tool meets tire lever in the Nutter

Cyclists just love their multi-tools. Unfortunately, given the emphasis that’s placed on keeping these tools small (and thus short), they usually provide very little leverage for tightening and loosening bolts. The Nutter addresses that problem by combining a multi-tool with something that most cyclists will be carrying with them anyway – a tire lever. Read More

Architecture

Sisma Calce seismic fabric helps hold buildings together during earthquakes

Changing building codes to ensure that new structures are less vulnerable to earthquakes is all well and good, but what about older buildings? If someone told you that the answer was wallpaper, you’d think they were crazy, but a team from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in Karlsruhe, Germany has developed a fabric to reinforce older walls. Marketed as “Sisma Calce,” the low-cost seismic fabric is designed to be plastered on walls to reduce earthquake damage or to at least give survivors a better chance of escape from falling debris.Read More

Mobile Technology

Microsoft Surface tablet gets torn apart, deemed difficult to self repair

There was a time not so long ago when updating, upgrading, repairing or otherwise tweaking your computer system was relatively tinkerer-friendly. Those halcyon days that helped fuel my drive toward a career as a computer engineer are now all-but over, and getting to the heart of today's ultra-thin notebooks and tablets calls for equal measures of cerebral athletics, manual dexterity and plain old luck. Happily, the folks over at iFixit are demystifying much of today's consumer electronic gadgets by ripping them apart, showing exactly what they're made of, and rating them for user repairability. Microsoft's new Surface tablet was recently given the teardown treatment and found to be quite a tough nut to crack ... but not quite as challenging as the iPad.Read More

Bicycles

Incog bike multi-tool stores in your handlebars

Anyone from high-flying freeriders to bike-touring workhorses can benefit from cutting weight out of their packs and bike bags, but they can't afford to cut out essential provisions like the tools needed for in-the-field bike repair. The inCOG bike tool cuts weight from cyclists' packs by integrating tools into the bike itself. Read More

Good Thinking

Students design goop-filled bags to fill potholes

Have you ever mixed corn starch with water? If you have, you probably noticed how it oozed like a liquid when flowing across a surface, yet hardened like a solid if you suddenly struck it. That’s because the corn starch/water mixture is what’s known as a non-Newtonian fluid – the particles it’s composed of slide past one another easily when moving slowly, but jam against each other when forced to move quickly. Recently, a group of students from Cleveland’s Case Western University encased such a fluid within sturdy bags, to create a simple product that could be used to temporarily fill potholes in roads.Read More

Urban Transport

Python 5000 patches potholes in minutes

Nobody likes potholes, but it often seems that they’re one of those hardships we just have to put up with until they get almost impassable ... after all, it’s a big deal to send out a road crew who will have to block one or two lanes of traffic for half an hour or more, while they risk being struck by inattentive drivers. Apparently, however, pothole-filling needn’t be such an involved process. Cities now have the option of using the Python 5000, which is a vehicle that is operated by one person from inside its cab, and that can patch a two-foot (0.6-meter) pothole in about two minutes.Read More

Bicycles

Bike mechanic pedals his workshop to clients' homes

For many people, commuting by bicycle is a fun, economical and healthy way of getting around. When their bike breaks down, they throw it in their car, drive it to the shop, then drive for several days until it’s fixed. Some bicycle commuters, however, don’t own cars. These people can’t drive their bike to the shop, and have no independent means of transportation as long as their two-wheeler is gone. It is for people like these – and others – that Wyse Cycles exists. As far as its owner Ben Wyse knows, it’s America’s only self-propelled mobile bicycle repair service.Read More

Telecommunications

AR system lets engineers show remote technicians what they're talking about

It can be very frustrating trying to fix something, when the person instructing you isn’t there in person, but is instead communicating with you over a phone line – “Whaddaya mean, ‘The silver cap’? Which silver cap?!” This is why engineers sometimes need to be flown in to factories or other places that use complex machines, to make repairs that simply can’t be explained verbally. Researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Communication, Information Processing and Ergonomics, however, have developed an augmented reality system that lets those engineers provide real-time visual instructions to distant on-site technicians ... and it can be done without internet access.Read More

    Advertisement
    Advertisement
    Advertisement

    See the stories that matter in your inbox every morning