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Pain Relief

Health & Wellbeing Review

Review: Strapping up for less pain with Better Back gizmo

We review a lot of high-tech gadgets here on Gizmag. But sometimes, the best solution to a problem doesn't require Bluetooth, batteries or bytes but rather, plain old physics. That's the case with the Better Back harness, a simple strap-based contraption that promises better posture and less lower back pain. We tried out Better Back for a few weeks to see if it makes good on its promises.Read More

Medical

Molecule-blocking drug opens new path to pain relief

New research has shown success at blocking specific molecules involved in maintaining pain following a nerve injury, significantly lowering patient discomfort. The tests were successful in laboratory mice, indicating that it might prove effective in human tests, and the method is simple and easy for doctors to perform.Read More

Medical

New pain-relief drug shapes as less addictive alternative to morphine

Opiates have brought pain relief to humankind for hundreds of years, but they don't come without consequences. Motor impairment and respiratory depression are a couple of potential side effects, but from opium-dependent Chinese of the mid-19th century to the morphine-riddled soldiers of the Vietnam War, the risk of addiction remains the biggest problem. Researchers have now developed a new painkiller they claim to be as strong as morphine, but without much of this unwanted baggage.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Painless electrical zaps may replace dental anesthesia needles

As much as some people fear getting dental fillings or root canals, what many of them are really afraid of is the needle that delivers the anesthetic into the mouth tissue. Even though the skin in the "jabbing area" is usually pretreated with a topical anesthetic, it can still hurt. Before long, however, a shot of electricity could make that topical treatment deep-acting enough that the needle isn't even needed.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Vivy brings the deep heat, in the fight against pain

If you don't know what diathermy is, you're not the only one. It's actually been around since 1907, and involves using high-frequency electromagnetic currents to generate heat in body tissue, accelerating the healing of injuries in the process. While it's previously been limited to clinical settings, ReGear Life Sciences' wearable Vivy device is designed to let people deliver their own treatments, wherever they happen to be.Read More

Medical

First-ever ibuprofen patch delivers pain relief right where it's needed

One problem with orally-administered painkillers is that even though you may just have pain in a particular area, the medication affects your whole body. This both increases the chance of side effects, and limits the effect of the medication on that one area. Now, however, scientists at Britain's University of Warwick have developed a solution – they've created the world's first ibuprofen skin patch.Read More

Medical

GM mice used in study to understand why some people can't feel pain

A new study from researchers at the UK's University College London (UCL) has examined a rare condition that makes people unable to feel pain, known as congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP). While previous projects have had little success in fully understanding the condition, the new effort represents a big breakthrough, pinpointing the key elements that cause it.Read More

Medical

Scientists turn blood into nerve cells in pursuit of better pain relief

As it stands, there's not a whole lot we know about pain. Where a tissue or blood sample can be drawn and studied, our nervous system comprising different kinds of cells running signals through complex piping around the body presents a difficult task for scientific research. But a new study details a technique that turns blood cells into different nerve cells, promising to improve our understanding of why things itch or burn. By extension, it is hoped that it could lead to new forms of pain relief that do away with unwanted side effects such as sleepiness or loss of concentration.Read More

Medical

Organic ion transistor blocks pain signals from reaching the brain

A new type of medical device could one day put the minds of chronic pain sufferers at ease by distributing the body's own natural pain relief signals at just the right time. Developed at Linköping University in Sweden, the tiny "ion pump" is made from organic electronics and could be implanted in patients, serving to cut off pain signals in the spinal chord before they make their way to the brain.Read More

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