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Recycled

Environment

The streets of Vancouver are paved with ... recycled plastic

According to the Economist Intelligence Unit's latest Global Liveability Report, the beautiful city of Vancouver in Canada is a pretty decent place to live, ranking third in the world. Its environmental footprint is currently unsustainable, though, prompting officials to hatch an ambitious plan to have Vancouver crowned the greenest city in the world by 2020. Helping things along nicely is a new warm mix paving process that makes use of the kind of waste plastic placed in blue household recycling boxes by conscientious citizens, reducing greenhouse gases and improving air quality along the way.Read More

Vapor Apparel spins trash into sustainable fashion

The textile and fashion industries have a huge environmental footprint as their production cycles rely on oil, pesticides, and great amounts of energy and water. For that reason, some companies are looking for new manufacturing methods, including recycling, as a way to mitigate their ecological footprint. One of them is Vapor Apparel, a U.S. company specializing in performance fabrics and digital sublimation printing that is launching a new range of 100 percent recycled fabric during the upcoming EcoPrint show in Berlin, Germany.Read More

Holiday Destinations

Sixty-foot water tower converted into urban residence

Maybe its their height. Maybe it's because they're round. But clearly there's something about abandoned water towers that makes people want to transform them into residential accommodation. Tower House in West London's desirable North Kensington neighborhood (though admittedly, not the plushest part) appears to be the latest addition to an ever-growing set; a set that includes the converted World War II tower, Chateau D'eau.Read More

Environment

Eco-friendly ATM accesses environmental savings

Brazil’s Edra Equipamentos has developed an eco-friendly ATM booth crafted from environmentally friendly raw materials. Instead of conventional, oil-derived resins, the walls and ceiling of the booth are built from a polymer derived from a combination of recycled plastic, such as PET bottles, and renewable sources, such as oilseed plants. A photovoltaic solar panel on the roof powers the booth’s LED lighting at night, while during the day natural light floods in through a clear “Solatube” system coated with a film from 3M that blocks more than 80 percent of infrared rays to help keep the interior cool.Read More

Architecture

Finnish micro house is small enough to build without a permit

Designer Robin Falck has created his very own micro home that is small enough to be built without a permit in Finland. According to Finnish regulations, you can bypass the permit process if the structure is smaller than 96 or 128 square feet (depending on where you build). With the help of a couple of local architects, Falck was able to make his original designs a reality and the result is this simple and stylish rural retreat.Read More

Architecture

Ferry converted into movable floating swimming pool to open in August

Floating swimming pools seem to be becoming a thing. Last year we looked at the +Pool concept to install just this sort of thing on one of New York's rivers - a concept that engineering consultancy Arup has since greenlit from a feasibility point of view, at least. And then there's realities:united's scheme for the world's longest swimming pool, called Flussbad, in the River Spree in Berlin. But now the 120-meter (394-feet) long Badboot Lido has seemingly leapfrogged the competition, opening for business this August in Antwerp, Belgium. Because the Badboot is adapted from a 1960s ferry, it can be moved around the city as needed.Read More

Automotive

Ford considers injecting old money into car manufacture

Once the cornerstone of economic prosperity, the passing of paper money from one hand to another is definitely on the decline in our modern digital age. Yet there are obviously lots of folks who still use cash, as evidenced by the eight to ten thousand pounds (3,628 - 4,535 kg) of crumpled and tired-looking paper currency that's said to be shredded every day in the U.S. alone, before being compressed into bricks and then buried or burned. That's a shocking waste, and car giant Ford appears to agree. As part of an ongoing effort to find sustainable alternatives to petroleum-based vehicle components, the Michigan-based multinational automaker is looking to re-use retired dollar bills in the manufacture of trays and bins, in the same way wheat straw is currently used in the Ford Flex.Read More

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