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Gizmag reviews the 2nd-generation Kindle Paperwhite

In our world of smartphones and tablets, is there still room for e-readers? Well, they may not be as sexy, powerful, or versatile as iPads, Galaxies, or HTC Ones. But then again, sometimes there's a lot to be said for a product that does one job very well. Join Gizmag, as we review Amazon's latest e-ink reader, the 2013 Kindle Paperwhite.  Read More

The Sparkup Magical Book Reader is a device which allows children to hear recordings of th...

Picture books are a great way to encourage your kids to embrace and enjoy reading. But as an adult, there're only so many times you can read Aliens Love Underpants and remain sane. The Sparkup Magical Book Reader is a device which clips onto books and lets you record the audio for each page, so that your children can hear you reading it to them as they flick through the pages on their own.  Read More

The new Kobo Aura HD

When it comes to eReaders, Amazon's Kindle and Barnes and Noble's Nook tend to get the most attention, but Kobo has put out a fair share of impressive e-book readers as well. The company recently revealed its latest device, the Aura HD, which features a 1440 x 1080 resolution on a 265 dpi screen, making it the highest resolution eReader available.  Read More

The Hama Wi-Fi Data Reader for Apple Devices means files can be wirelessly accessed by an ...

With the proliferation of smart-cameras, cameras with wireless capabilities and Wi-Fi memory cards, it's never been easier to get your images where you want without resorting to using cables. Adding to these options, Hama has just announced a wireless card reader which is designed to transfer photos and videos onto your iPad or iPhone sans wires. The Wi-Fi Data Reader for Apple Devices can also be used as a Wi-Fi repeater/router.  Read More

With Google shutting down Google Reader, we break down the top alternatives

Were you disappointed at the news that Google will soon kill its RSS service, Google Reader? If so, you aren't alone. Fortunately, you have until July 1 to find a worthy alternative. Read on, as we break down the best Google Reader replacements.  Read More

Google announced that it's shuttering the Google Reader RSS service on July 1 (tombstone i...

For well over a decade, Rich Site Summary (RSS) has been one of the easiest ways to keep track of your favorite websites. The most popular RSS service – by a longshot – has been Google Reader. But as people turn more to social networks and content-curating apps like Flipboard for news, RSS has become an endangered species. On July 1, Google will accelerate its extinction by putting the nail in Reader’s coffin.  Read More

How do the best eReaders from Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Kobo stack up?

Five years after the release of the first Kindle, eReaders are still going strong. Despite the threat from tablets, many customers still love e-ink screens. If you're wanting to get in on the fun, the choices can be overwhelming. Let us help – with our 2012 eReader Comparison Guide.  Read More

The Humane Reader is a $20 8-bit computer that contains an offline version of Wikipedia, a...

When you search for just about anything on the Internet, it seems like a Wikipedia entry on that subject is almost always amongst the top ten hits. Despite rumors of dissent within its ranks, the encyclopedic website is one of the largest single repositories of knowledge in the world. So, with that in mind, what do you do if you want to bring a significant portion of the information on the Internet to people who can’t afford net access? You load a searchable offline version of Wikipedia onto a US$20 8-bit computer, that they can watch through their TVs. That’s what computer consultant Braddock Gaskill has done with his Humane Reader, which he hopes will find a place in homes, schools and libraries in developing nations.  Read More

Apple creates special information site for iPad

In all likelihood, a new era of computing began today as Apple’s long-awaited iPad finally stepped from scifi into reality and filled the massive gap between Apple’s iPhone/ iPod handhelds and its richer computing experience of the MacBook laptop range. It begins life with a headstart never enjoyed by any prior new device. As Steve Jobs emphasised when launching the device, more than 75 million people already know how to use the iPad (because it’s essentially identical to the iPhone and iPod, just bigger) and there more than 125 million customers with one-click shopping on iTunes, the App Store and hence, the new iBook store. The iPad adds books and newspapers to the convergence mix and must seriously threaten the business models of all those eReaders announced earlier this month. Apple has created a special web site to disseminate information on the iPad.  Read More

PlasticLogic's Maureen Mellon explains the features of the QUE ProReader

Gizmag met with PlasticLogic, the makers of the QUE ProReader eBook reader/tablet - one of the most versatile and powerful eReaders to hit the market. The Que ProReader measures the size of standard piece of office paper (8.5 x 11 inches) and focuses on the business professional. Though not designed to replace your laptop or smartphone, it is designed to make paper redundant. Already there are more than 1 million pieces of online content that can be downloaded and viewed on the device. Plus you can print from your computer to the QUE Pro to carry your personal documents with you, or use it as a back-up device. Connectivity options abound with built-in WiFi, 3G and Bluetooth.  Read More

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