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Rain

Stebles Bike will sport integrated carbon fiber fenders

If you're a cyclist who rides in the rain frequently, chances are that you're going to put fenders on your daily commuter bike. Doing so can be a hassle, however, plus they often end up rattling or rubbing. That's why UK product designer Mark Stebles created his Stebles Bike – its front and rear mudguards are actually part of its frame.Read More

Outdoors

Cypress Umbrella doesn't flip out, thanks to automotive-inspired rib suspension system

Quality products generally make tasks easier to accomplish while lasting longer than their cheaper counterparts. When it comes to staying dry outside in tempestuous weather, however, almost all umbrellas tend to suffer similar shortcomings. The Cypress, however, may be the last and best umbrella you'll ever own, as its telescopic suspension system is designed to be stronger, durable, and more resistant to flipping inside-out.Read More

Rainwater used to generate electricity

When we complain about the rain, other people will often say "Yeah, but it's good for the plants." Well, thanks to a microturbine-based system created by three students from the Technological University of Mexico, it's now also being used to generate electricity for use in low-income homes. Read More

Automotive

McLaren's ultrasonic force field to replace windshield wipers

Windshield wipers are life-savers, but also can drive one to distraction with their incessant streaking and chattering. Well, the tyranny of the wipers may soon be over. McLaren Automotive’s chief designer Frank Stephenson told The Sunday Times that the performance motoring company is investigating the use of "ultrasonic force fields" to replace windshield wipers in automobiles. While Stephenson referred to a military source for McLaren's tech, there appears to be very little public information on how such force fields might clean a windshield during a storm, so I'm taking a look at the patent history to see how this might be accomplished.Read More

Science

Moving cars could be used to measure rainfall

Rain gauges are generally pretty accurate at measuring the amount of precipitation that has fallen at their location, but they can't be everywhere. This means that average rainfall figures for a region could be inaccurate, if considerably more or less rain has been falling in unmonitored areas. Cars, however, are just about everywhere that there are roads. With that in mind, researchers from Germany's University of Hanover are looking at using them to tell us how much water is coming from the sky. Read More

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