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Racing

Robotics

Prosthesis human-piloted racing robot aims to usher in a new sport

Who wouldn't want to slip into Iron Man's armor or try out the gigantic Jaegers that saved the world in the movie Pacific Rim? Wearable exoskeletons currently being built, from the military-based TALOS, XOS 2 and HULC to rehabilitative models like the ReWalk, MindWalker and X1, all have one thing in common; they are all robotic automated body suits designed to enhance or assist people. Is there a place for a skill-oriented, non-robotic walking exoskeleton, that a person would have to master physically by feel, much like how one might master riding a bicycle or using a skateboard? Jonathan Tippet thinks so. He and his team of volunteers are building Prosthesis, claimed to be the world's first human-piloted racing robot. It's a 5-meter (16-ft) tall behemoth that will rely entirely on the pilot's skill to balance itself or walk or run. Read More

Ayrton Senna's Honda NSX up for sale

Ayrton Senna, considered to be one of Formula One’s most legendary drivers, was apparently also very much a fan of Honda’s road cars; more specifically the NSX. In total Senna owned three of the mid-engined exotics. Now one of these gems has been listed on eBay for a mere US$180,000.Read More

Bicycles

SPEEDrelease bike hub combines advantages of quick-release and thru-axle

For the past several decades, higher-end bicycles have utilized quick-release axles in their wheel hubs, in order to facilitate fast and easy wheel removal. With the recent movement towards disc brakes on mountain bikes, however, some manufacturers have started using a more rigid, secure thru-axle setup. Given that discs should soon be showing up on more and more road bikes, Connecticut-based Topolino Technology recently unveiled its SPEEDrelease hub, which reportedly combines the best features of both systems in one lightweight design.Read More

Automotive

Magnum unveils multi-use MK5 track-car

Relatively unknown in the automotive mainstream, Canada’s Magnum began building open-wheeled race cars and specialized parts in the late 1960s. Now the boutique manufacturer from Quebec has moved to the streets with the introduction of the open-aired, dual-purpose Magnum MK5.Read More

Automotive Feature

50 years of McLaren: 1963-2013

McLaren, the small yet mighty UK boutique auto house that has given the planet some of its most brilliant Formula 1 and production cars, turned fifty this year. Here's Gizmag's look at the company's journey from a back shed in New Zealand to a world-renowned name in the highest circles of automotive excellence. Read More

Automotive Feature

The adventures of an F1 corner marshal

Standing 20 feet from a race track while dozens of the most expensive cars in the world scream past at almost 200 mph – some might call it the best seat in the house. Except you can’t sit down. The corner marshals are the people stationed out on the track tasked with waving flags, removing debris and helping drivers whose cars have crashed. Last year I was able to volunteer to be among the large track crew for the inaugural US Formula 1 Grand Prix at the Course of the Americas in Austin, Texas, which marked the return of Formula 1 racing to the United States after several years of absence. So what's life like for a corner marshal when race weekend rolls around?Read More

Automotive

In pictures: Monterey Car Week

Monterey Car Week is a gathering of the most sublime examples of four-wheeled transportation the world has to offer. The 2013 event was no exception, spanning everything from the latest concept vehicles to million dollar museum pieces and collectibles from the likes of Ferrari, Lamborghini, Alfa Romeo and Bugatti. Here's Gizmag's through-the-lens look at the highlights from this Californian automotive feast.Read More

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