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Purdue University

Space

MIT study redefines the role of meteorites in the formation of the early solar system

Until now, it has been generally accepted that a meteor constitutes a time capsule – a relic of the early creation of the solar system that has fallen to Earth, allowing us to delve into the distant past by looking at the composition of the essentially unchanged material that formed the basis of planetary formation. However, a new study carried out by researchers from MIT and Purdue University seeks to challenge the established belief, asserting that rather than representing the kernel of planetary creation, that they are instead a by-product of the violent and often cataclysmic process.Read More

Mobile Technology

Experts call for risk scores to improve smartphone app security

Next time you download or update an app for your smartphone or tablet and blitz through messages asking for permissions approval, you may be unnecessarily exposing your personal information to possible cyber violation. Researchers suggest this issue could potentially be addressed through better consumer education and an easy to understand risk score for each app.Read More

Medical

Prototype prints precise, patient-specific drug doses

It can be tricky to take exactly one fourths of a pill or the specific dose of prescribed medication, which is why researchers at Purdue University have come up with a way to print the proper dosage that a patient requires. Their prototype uses inkjet printing technology and a predictive mathematical model that calculates exactly how much medicine the patients needs and prints out the precise doses into tablets or films.Read More

Science

Purdue researchers pursue cave corn

Scientists at Purdue University have come up with a way of growing corn in caves, but it doesn't involve some bizarre mating of maize and mushroom. Instead, they manipulated artificial light and temperature in such a way that the growth of the corn plants, while stunted, didn't significantly affect the seed yield. The finding could have a significant impact on the future of genetically modified crops by helping prevent genetically modified pollen escaping into the ecosystem. Read More

Science

Fabricated nanoantennas used to produce high-resolution holograms

Holography is one of the more dramatic forms of photography, in which a three-dimensional image is stored on a photographic plate in the form of interference fringes. Researchers at Purdue University in Indiana have developed a different approach, in which a 3D image is stored in a structure of thousands of V-shaped nanoantennas etched into an ultrathin gold foil. The new approach dramatically shrinks the size of a hologram, potentially enabling photonic and plasmonic devices and optical switches small enough to be integrated into computer chips.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Head-tracking ReadingMate system lets users read while they run

Attachable stands or (less affordable) devices like the WeBike make it possible to exercise both body and mind while pedaling on the spot, but those pounding away on a treadmill are pretty much limited to listening to music or zoning out in front of a TV screen to keep their minds occupied. That could change with a new system developed by researchers at Purdue University. Called ReadingMate, the system uses head-tracking technology to keep onscreen text bobbing along in unison with the runner’s eyes.Read More

Environment

Recyclable solar cells created using trees

Researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology and Purdue University have developed new solar cells based on natural substances derived from plants, including trees. The organic solar cells have an efficiency of 2.7 percent – a new high for cells on substrates derived from renewable raw materials – and can be easily recycled. Read More

Science

Ping-pong gun fires balls at supersonic speeds

The fastest serve ever recorded by a ping-pong player moved at about 70 mph (113 km/h). Professor Mark French of Purdue University's Mechanical Engineering Technology department and his graduate students, Craig Zehrung and Jim Stratton, have built an air gun for classroom demonstrations that fires a ping-pong ball at over Mach 1.2 (900 mph or 1,448 km/h). As the picture above shows, that's fast enough for the hollow celluloid balls to blow a hole through a standard paddle. Read More

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