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Prototype

In designing and prototyping electronic circuit boards there is no quick or simple way to produce results. Many hours of design and development need to be expended on prototype layouts along with masking, etching, and populating those boards with components. Even after all of this, just one simple layout mistake can ruin all of your work and you have to go through the entire process again. The Voltera V-One aims to change all of that with the promise of a one button, conductive ink printing system solely designed to reduce the effort in rapid, small run hardware prototyping. Read More
3-D printing has been one of the biggest crazes in tech over the past few years. And as with other big tech crazes before it – think smartphones and tablets – the age of entry is lowering. Last year, we took a look at the ill-fated Printeer kids' printer. The all-new Bonsai Lab BS Toy we checked out at the recent 2015 Nuremberg Toy Fair picks up where that one left off, offering a simple design aimed at families and children. Read More
By applying 120 year old radio frequency antenna theory to the much newer field of photonics, researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory claim to have produced a prototype optical antenna that increases the intensity of emission from a nanorod light source by more than 115 times. This technique may offer the opportunity to replace power-hungry lasers in short-range optical communications devices with enhanced low-power LEDs. Read More
A 3D-printed, partially-solar-powered, battery electric car created by students at Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University (NTU) is all set to zoom across the racetrack at Shell’s Eco-marathon Asia later this month. With a body shell comprising 150 printed parts, mounted on a carbon fiber single shell chassis, the NTU Venture (NV) 8 is an urban concept car that can reportedly achieve a top speed of about 60 km/h (37 mph). Racing in the solar prototype category will NTU's prototype three-wheeler, the NV 9. Read More
If there's one job that a person would probably prefer to lose to a robot, it would be fighting fires aboard ships. To help make such a vision a reality, the US Navy and the Office of Naval Research (ONR) released details of demonstration exercises conducted by their Shipboard Autonomous Firefighting Robot (SAFFiR) aboard the fire training ship USS Shadwell last November. Read More
For coffee enthusiasts, preparing a brew can be as important as what beans are being used. Gizmag has covered lots of coffee makers over the years, but how the beans are ground also makes a difference. The Handground coffee grinder promises a consistent and precision grind for a better flavor. Read More
A new prototype instant camera case promises to let you print photographs directly from your Android or Apple smartphone, and in just 30 seconds. Dubbed Prynt, the modular unit acts as both a phone case and printer, and boasts an all-in-one ink and paper refill pack that claims to make reloading on the go a breeze. Read More
The next big discovery is always beyond the next hill, but what if you can't see over it? That's the problem facing NASA with its Mars rovers, so the space agency is looking into how robotic helicopters could help scout the land ahead and give engineers back on Earth data to help plot the best route. Read More
Robot drones that can both fly and move about on land would vastly improve their usefulness by increasing the areas in which they could operate. Adding wheels of sufficient size to handle most terrains, however, would adversely increase both the weight and size of such a drone. Researchers at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL), building on their earlier developments, have created a drone that uses wings incorporating movable tips, allowing it to both walk and fly. Read More
Swiss scientists have created the first semiconductor laser consisting solely of elements of main group IV (the carbon group) on the periodic table. Simply, this means that the new device is directly compatible with other elements in that group – such as silicon, carbon, and lead – and so can be directly incorporated in a silicon chip as it is manufactured. This presents new possibilities for transmitting data around computer chips using light, which could result in potential transfer speeds exponentially faster than possible with copper wire and using only a fraction of the energy of today’s integrated circuits. Read More
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