Highlights from the 2014 LA Auto Show

Plasma

Panasonic 2009 TV range (TH-P42G10A)

Although LCD has been clearly outselling plasmas TVs in recent times, plasma still maintains a number of advantages over its rival format, most notably in contrast ratio. So while some manufacturers, such as Pioneer, have ceased making plasma panels, Panasonic is persisting, with plans to launch 11 new VIERA plasma models this year. Although the company understands the value of LCD, too, with nine LCD models included in the 2009 VIERA TV line-up.  Read More

Panasonic's prototype 8.8mm thin 50-inch plasma

Panasonic is giving Australian consumers a glimpse of future plasma display technologies first showcased at CES 2009. The two 50-inch prototype plasma TVs demonstrate next generation improvements to materials and processes, cell design, and circuit and drive technology, resulting in less energy consumption and twice the luminous efficiency of earlier models, all in an ultra-thin 8.8mm thick package.  Read More

At 103 inches, Bang & Olufsen's BeoVision4-103 is one of the biggest on the market

If Bang & Olufsen’s spanking new BeoVision 4 103-inch plasma TV were a mouth it would swallow you whole – and you wouldn’t even touch the sides going down. That’s how big it is – and one of the biggest going around – with a pretty big price to match.  Read More

A conceptual model of the proposed Panasonic P2 3D camera

While the popularity of 3D movies has had more ups and downs than a roller coaster, the technology is experiencing a resurgence in popularity with Hollywood scrambling to generate more 3D content. The latest manufacturer taking the ride up is Panasonic. The electronics giant has announced it will start developing a professional 3D Full HD production system consisting of a twin-lens P2 professional camera recorder and a 3D-compatible High Definition Plasma display.  Read More

LG's Technology Design Centre at the Melbourne F1 Grand Prix

LG's latest Audio/Visual offerings are moving down the path of connectivity and convergence, and delivering some very nice user interfaces. LG's new "Technology Design Centre" made its debut at the Melbourne Formula One Grand Prix on the weekend where the Korean company introduced its PS80 big-screen plasma "Time Machine" TV, with built-in hard drive and digital video recording, its YouTube-capable super-fast BD370 Blu-ray player, its HB954WA 1000w home theatre 5.1 system, tuned by Mark Levinson and featuring wireless rear speakers, and the LH50, an ultra-quick 200hz LED-backlit LCD TV that intelligently adjusts picture controls according to the ambient light conditions in the room.  Read More

 The era of digital signage approaches

With large screen prices dropping dramatically due to mass production, digital signs are now at a price point where they make sense as a cost-efficient communication medium for a variety of applications across retail, hospitality, tourism, public transport, trade shows and out-of-home advertising. Panasonic released three Full High Definition (FHD) commercial Plasma panels this week, topped by a 1920 x 1080p 58 incher with 1,000,000:1 dynamic contrast ratio, a 100,000 hour life span and a front panel of tempered glass for protection in hostile public places. The screens can simultaneously display two different AV sources and hook together 25 at a time as multi-screen systems.  Read More

Panasonic's display at CES 2009

With the head of LG Display recently quoted as saying that flat-panel LCD prices have bottomed, the world's electronics manufacturers are looking for the next big thing to keep the coffers ticking over. With a number of companies rolling out various 3D TV technologies over the years, it’s obvious that many think that this will be the next big thing. Panasonic is one such company that has spent a lot of time and money investing in 3DTV. The fruit of its labor: the world’s first 3D Full HD (3DFHD) Plasma Home Theater System.  Read More

Mitsubishi's Laser TV now shipping in the US

October 30, 2008 Following its premiere as a totally new display category at the CES in January, a 65-inch version of Mitsubishi's LaserVue high-definition television has hit U.S. stores. The world's first laser-powered TV, which promises unparalleled performance including twice the color and significantly lower power consumption than both its LCD and Plasma cousins, is being sold for USD$6,999. At 10 inches, it might be slightly thicker than some of the flat-screen offerings we've seen in recent times, but the trade-off is a set that delivers 1080p definition at 120Hz and operating power of approximately 135W using laser beams to provide "an extensive range of rich, complex colors, along with truly distinct clarity and immersive depth of field" according to Mitsubishi.  Read More

Vampire Energy

July 31, 2008 Yesterday we showed you GOOD Magazine's data on Vampire Energy, but Ben Drawbaugh from Engadget HD didn't like the look of it. Using a Kill A Watt, he measured the standby draw of a 60-inch Pioneer Kuro plasma to be 20 Watts - that's an annual cost of $20 (based on a price of $0.11 per kilowatt-hour) - far from the $159 figure that GOOD Magazine claimed.  Read More

The plasma-powered flying saucer

University of Florida mechanical and aerospace engineering associate professor Subrata Roy has submitted a patent for a circular, spinning craft that can hover and take off vertically. The wingless electromagnetic air vehicle, or WEAV, is just six inches across, but has the potential to be scaled up to a much larger size. The WEAV is covered with electrodes that ionise the surrounding air into plasma, which functions as the conducting fluid. Passing a current through the plasma creates lift and momentum.  Read More

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