Highlights from the 2014 LA Auto Show

Photography

The Sony KW1 looks like a perfume bottle, but acts like a camera

The newly announced Sony KW1 is about as quirky as cameras get. Not only is the selfie-centric shooter designed to look like a perfume bottle, but it also comes loaded with features to make its users look more attractive in their photographs. There's also a 180 degree rotating lens and built-in Wi-Fi for the instant sharing of those digitally enhanced selfies.  Read More

The Leica M-P a discreet variation of the M camera which lacks the iconic red dot

Leica has announced the launch of the M-P rangefinder camera. The new model improves on the original Leica M by featuring a bigger buffer, a sapphire glass display-cover, and a frame selection lever for subject framing. The German firm has also opted to make the M-P more discreet by omitting the iconic red dot.  Read More

The Sony Alpha A5100 features a 24.3-megapixel APS-C sensor and a super-fast autofocus sys...

Sony has added to its line-up of mirrorless cameras with the A5100, a small but seemingly very capable shooter which fits in between the entry-level A5000 and the more enthusiast-focused A6000. The new camera features a 24.3-megapixel APS-C sensor, a super-fast autofocus system, a tilting touchscreen monitor, and built-in Wi-Fi and NFC connectivity.  Read More

An original photo of a paper crane (left) and an artificially-rotated version of it

Many people are already annoyed when characters on TV cop shows "zoom in and enhance" on a photo, to reveal a level of detail that could never really have been captured by the camera. Thanks to software developed at Carnegie Mellon University, however, it's now possible to actually turn objects in a photo around ... seemingly revealing sides of them that were facing away from the camera when the picture was taken.  Read More

Canon has added two new super-zoom bridge cameras to its PowerShot line-up, the SX520 HS a...

Canon has revealed a pair of new PowerShot bridge cameras for people who want big zooms, on a budget. The DSLR-styled SX520 HS boasts a massive 24-1,008-mm equivalent zoom lens, and the SX400 IS isn't far behind with its 30x 24-720-mm equivalent. Both cameras also feature optical image stabilization to help tame those monster zooms.  Read More

Gizmag helps you choose the best camera for your next vacation

What camera will you take on your next vacation? Maybe it needs to be small enough to carry as you trek to Machu Picchu, or survive underwater when you go scuba-diving in the Bahamas. It might need enough zoom to get up close with animals on a safari in the Maasai Mara, or the low-light image quality to capture the streets of Paris at night. Let Gizmag help you choose the best camera for your next vacation.  Read More

The CaseCam features a camera lens mirror that folds away when not needed

Ah yes, it's a problem for the ages. You want to be in a photo taken with your own unmanned smartphone, but you have no way of propping the phone up, or seeing what the shot looks like. Well, the CaseCam is designed to help. It allows a phone laid down on a flat surface to see what's in front of it, plus the accompanying app lets you see what it's seeing.  Read More

The Hasselblad CFV-50c features a 50-megapixel CMOS sensor

Hasselblad has revealed that its iconic V System is set to get new lease of life, with the release of a new CMOS sensor-based digital back. The new digital back, which will work with almost every V camera made since 1957, is said to offer the same functionality and performance as the recent H5D-50c camera.  Read More

The Pentax XG-1 bridge camera boasts an impressive reach and speed

Ricoh Imaging has unveiled its latest DSLR-style mega-zoom bridge camera, the Pentax XG-1. The new 16-megapixel camera features an almost ridiculous 24-1,248-mm equivalent focal length range, and can knock out a speedy nine frames per second. This, combined with its entry-level price-tag, looks sure to make the XG-1 a hit with wildlife and sports shooters on a budget.  Read More

A light-equipped UAV moves to maintain the desired lighting on the model

As any professional photographer knows, setting up lights can be a hassle. This is often the case in the studio, but especially when shooting on location. Before too long, however, it may be possible to use hovering autonomous drones as light sources. In fact, that's just what a team from MIT and Cornell University has already done. Their system not only does away with light stands, but the light-equipped aircraft automatically moves to compensate for movements of the model or photographer.  Read More

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