Advertisement
more top stories »

Phase change material

— Around The Home

Heat-energy storage device could make household solar power more feasible

By - October 15, 2014 1 Picture
Although solar panels are active while the sun is shining, they typically don't do much once the sun goes down. This is why some systems incorporate water tanks. The water is heated during the day via the panels, then that stored thermal energy (heat) is used to warm the home at night. While the tanks are effective, they also take up a lot of space, making them difficult to fit into peoples' homes. A newly-developed device, however, stores just as much heat in half the space – using paraffin instead of water. Read More
— Robotics

Phase-change material could let robots be soft or hard-bodied as needed

By - July 15, 2014 1 Picture
If you've ever watched an octopus, you may have noticed how they can deliver powerful grasping force when necessary, yet can also squeeze through tiny openings by essentially making themselves "liquid." Now imagine if there were robots that could do the same thing. They could conceivably squirm through debris to reach buried survivors at disaster sites, or even travel through patients' bodies to perform medical procedures. An international team of scientists is working on making such technology a reality, using a combination of polyurethane foam and wax. Read More
— Electronics

"Nano-pixels" hold huge potential for flexible, low-power, high-res screens

By - July 10, 2014 2 Pictures
The Retina displays featured on Apple's iPhone 4 and 5 models pack a pixel density of 326 ppi, with individual pixels measuring 78 micrometers. That might seem plenty good enough given the average human eye is unable to differentiate between the individual pixels, but scientists in the UK have now developed technology that could lead to extremely high-resolution displays that put such pixel densities to shame. Read More
— Around The Home

Phase-change mug is claimed to keep coffee hot (but not TOO hot) for hours

By - December 12, 2013 3 Pictures
Drinking hot beverages can be a tricky business. If you don't want them becoming tepid too quickly, you have to pour them into your mug while they're still too hot. Even then, you're left with a relatively short period in which they're "just right." The designers of the Temperfect mug, however, want to change that. They claim that their mug can keep your drink at the perfect sipping temperature for hours at a time, without using any electricity. Read More
— Automotive

CryoSolplus could help keep EV batteries cool

By - July 13, 2012 1 Picture
One of the big enemies of electric vehicle batteries is heat. Batteries already warm up under normal use, but when hot summer temperatures or high workloads are thrown in, overheating becomes a real possibility. According to the Fraunhofer Institute for Environmental, Safety and Energy Technology, running a battery at ten degrees over its maximum “comfort level” of about 35ºC (95ºF) can deplete its service life by half. That’s why researchers there have developed a battery coolant known as CryoSolplus, which is said to offer three times the cooling capacity of plain water. Read More
— Good Thinking

Apollo shirt uses space suit technology to regulate body temperature

By - July 5, 2012 9 Pictures
So you're looking dapper in your snappy business suit as you head out into the afternoon sun to walk a few blocks to your next meeting but by the time you arrive you're a good deal less fresh than when you set off just moments before. Your expensive new super white cotton shirt is stuck to your back and something nasty is taking to the air around you. This is precisely the kind of scenario that the Apollo shirt from Ministry of Supply was designed to combat. The wrinkle-free dress shirt makes use of NASA technology to help regulate body temperature, while also neutralizing pit-pong and adapting to the movement of the wearer. Read More
— Motorcycles

Purdue University students develop high performance electric motorbike

By - February 1, 2012 14 Pictures
It doesn't seem too long ago when we were reporting on breakthroughs in battery technology that would allow electric motorbikes like the Brammo Enertia to travel as much as 45 miles (72 km) on a single charge. These days, we're seeing most of the recent arrivals (such as the 2012 Zero S range, for instance, or the gorgeous custom-built Brutus 2.0) flying past the 100 miles (160 km) barrier with relative ease, a range long enough to quieten even the most fervent of petrol-heads. Two Purdue University engineering students have recently completed the conversion of a Yamaha YZF600r to electric power that further pushes the envelope to more than 120 miles (193 km), using batteries cooled by phase change material. Read More
— Science

New heat-regulating building material could cut building heating and cooling costs

By - August 2, 2011 2 Pictures
Researchers at the Ningpo, China campus of the University of Nottingham (UNNC) have created a new heat-regulating material that could be used to cut the heating and cooling costs of buildings. The non-deformed storage phase change material (PCM) can be fixed so that it starts absorbing any excess heat above a pre-determined temperature and releasing stored heat when the ambient temperature drops below the set point. The researchers say the material can be manufactured in a variety of shapes and sizes, even small enough so that it can be sprayed as a microscopic film to surfaces in existing buildings. Read More
— Science

IBM demonstrates multi-bit phase-change memory chip

By - June 30, 2011 1 Picture
Scientists from IBM Research – Zurich are claiming a world-first, for their recent demonstration of “reliable multi-bit phase-change memory [PCM] technology.” PCM involves the use of materials that change between crystalline and amorphous states, the two states having different levels of electrical resistance – data is stored in a binary fashion, using one level to represent a 0, and the other to represent a 1. By applying new techniques to existing PCM technology, the researchers were reportedly able to write and retrieve data 100 times faster than is possible with Flash. Read More
Advertisement

Subscribe to Gizmag's email newsletter

Advertisement