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Pedaling

— Urban Transport

NuVinci Harmony brings automatic shifting to e-bikes

By - August 9, 2011 6 Pictures
Fallbrook Technologies released the NuVinci Continuously Variable (CVP) N170 transmission for bicycles in 2007. The rear hub-based system does away with distinct, defined gears, it’s sealed against dirt and other contaminants (unlike a derailleur), and it allows riders to change drive transmission ratios even when standing still. Last year, the company unveiled the NuVinci N360, which is smaller and lighter than the N170, yet has a wider range of ratios. This Tuesday, Fallbrook announced yet another incarnation of the technology – the NuVinci Harmony, which is an auto-shifting version of the N360. Read More
— Bicycles

EGO-Kits give downhill mountain bikes a boost

By - February 15, 2011 4 Pictures
While electric commuting bikes are currently experiencing a surge in popularity, electric mountain bikes such as the Conway E-Rider and the KTM eGnition are also showing up on tradeshow floors with increasing frequency. Most of these are designed as cross-country and/or trail bikes, with the idea that the motor can extend their range above the reaches of pure human power – of course, they might also appeal to couch potatoes who want all the fun of mountain biking, with a minimum of the exercise. The EGO-Kit, however, is an electric motor that can be added onto an existing downhill mountain bike, with the specific purpose of replacing a chair lift for getting bike and rider to the top of the mountain. Read More
— Bicycles

Going chainless with the Stringbike

By - September 27, 2010 13 Pictures
At first glance, a proposal to replace a bicycle's familiar chain and cog drive with one that uses string may sound like lunacy, but that's exactly what's been done to produce the Stringbike. The system features freewheel mechanisms on either side of the rear wheel connected by polyethylene rope to a precisely positioned, symmetrical swinging arm that drives the bicycle forward. When the unit on the right is driving the bike forward, the other is being returned to its starting position and vice-versa which is said to result in greater efficiency and makes for a more comfortable, easier ride. Read More
— Bicycles

Smaller, lighter NuVinci bicycle transmission revealed

By - September 1, 2010 2 Pictures
Three years ago, Fallbrook Technologies introduced its NuVinci Continuously Variable Planetary (CVP) N170 transmission for bicycles. The device created something of a stir in the cycling community, as it replaces traditional derailleurs with a rear hub containing metal spheres, plus it also replaces distinct gears with a continuously variable system of transmitting mechanical power – kind of like comparing a three-setting desk lamp to one with a dimmer switch. Riders can change gears even when not pedaling, they don’t need to worry about improper chainring/cog combinations, and the fiddly bits aren’t out in the open where the dirt can get at them. The N170 is heavier than a conventional derailleur system, which is why you don’t see it much on bikes other than cruisers. That could change, however, with this Wednesday’s announcement of the NuVinci N360 transmission. Fallbrook claims it has all the good points of the N170, but is 30 percent lighter and 17 percent smaller. Read More
— Marine

A first-ever human-powered Canada-to-Hawaii crossing?

By - January 27, 2010 10 Pictures
Back in January 2007, we brought you the story of Greg Kolodziejzyk, a Canadian adventurer who was planning to break the human-powered transatlantic record. What made Greg’s record attempt so interesting was that he was going to do it in a fully-enclosed pedal-powered sea kayak. The boat was still under construction at the time. Flash forward to January 2010, and Greg has had to call off the transatlantic attempt due to logistic problems. His new boat, however, is a marvel of marine engineering, and he’s planning on pedaling it from Canada to Hawaii. Read More
— Bicycles

The Pedal-A-Watt Stationary Bike Power Generator: create energy and get fit

By - November 24, 2009 1 Picture
As people the world over continue to search for renewable energy sources, innovative and interesting ideas for generating power are constantly being devised. Those interested in keeping fit and producing power at the same time might be interested in this unique product – the Pedal-A-Watt. It converts your bicycle into a stationary bike and uses your pedal power to generate energy that can be stored in a power pack. An average rider can produce up to 200 watts – ride for an hour and you'll generate enough to power a 25 watt fluorescent light bulb for eight hours. Read More
— Urban Transport

SOHH: Solar human hybrid transport for the whole family (and the dog)

By - June 19, 2009 4 Pictures
If the words "human hybrid" conjure terrifying images of Christian Bale battling it out against Skynet and a league of Terminators then the Solar Human Hybrid Project (SOHH for short) might come as a bit of light relief. It's a one of a kind, great-looking 4-wheeler where the power comes courtesy of the harmonization of solar energy and a good old-fashioned lower body workout. There's an iPod dock, a GPS navigation system, a cargo area and even a platform especially for the dog. It's definitely a worthy contender for the crown of coolest green transportation around. Oh, and it's also a school project. Read More
— Marine

Hobie Pro Angler: fully-featured fishing boat for one

By - June 8, 2009 38 Pictures
I spied the Hobie Pro Angler for the first time last week and couldn’t help but feel it was the perfect boat for the mobile fisherman. I own a Hobie Adventure Island and I’m completely sold on Hobie’s MirageDrive as it offers the most efficient, quiet and clean motive power available. Based on a new ultra-stable platform with a capacity of over 600 pounds, a new ultra-comfortable Cool Ride seat, a massive deck with fishing-friendly nooks and replaceable mounting boards on each side to attach your fish finder, GPS, lights, or downriggers and … PERFECT! Read More
— Bicycles

Stylyx: The bottom and back friendly bicycle

By - March 4, 2009 5 Pictures
Ever since the first incarnations of what was to become the modern bicycle rolled through European streets in the early 1800s, anyone astride two-wheel transport has faced a common problem - a sore derriere. Stylyx has addressed this problem with the introduction of its new range of road bikes which include a uniquely shaped seat and upright riding position designed to reduce the soreness and back strain that puts many people off riding. Read More

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