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Bicycles Review

Review: MagLOCK magnetic pedals should attract a certain crowd

Many mountain bikers swear by the pedalling efficiency of so-called clipless pedals, in which a steel cleat on the bottom of each shoe engages a spring-loaded mechanism in the pedal. Some other riders, however, just don't like the idea of being "snapped in" like that. It was with this in mind that cyclist Dave Williams created MagLOCK pedals. They're non-threatening platform pedals, that keep the user's feet in place using magnets instead of mechanisms. We recently had a chance to try them out, and generally liked what they had to offer.Read More

Bicycles

MagLOCK takes another kick at magnetic clipless bike pedals

Last November we first heard about MagLOCK pedals – clipless mountain bike pedals that use magnets instead of springs to keep the rider's feet attached, and that can also be used as regular platform pedals. The product fell short of its crowdfunding goal, perhaps because the pedals were kind of clunky, but MagLOCK designer Dave Williams is now back on Kickstarter with a sleeker, lighter and less expensive version.Read More

Music

Aalberg announces two more effects pedals ahead of Frankfurt reveal

Changing parameters on a floor-based stomp while playing a song on stage or in the studio is tricky. Aalberg Audio's first effects pedal announced last year aimed to bring some setting-switching ease to the process by allowing players to wirelessly control parameters using a little box that could be attached to a guitar strap or belt. Even though the Ekko and Aero double act is still to be released, the company has already announced two new additions to the family ... the Rom and Trym.Read More

Music

DigiTech squeezes a backing band into Trio stomp

Last October, Gizmag grooved along to what has to be the world's most reliable drummer – the BeatBuddy drum machine stomp. Next month, DigiTech will release a new guitar pedal called the Trio that crams a funky bass player into a pedalboard-friendly box alongside a virtual bin basher. The Band Creator pedal is reported capable of automatically generating bass and drum parts that match the rhythmic feel or chord progressions being belted out by the guitar player leading the power trio.Read More

Bicycles

MagLOCK offers a magnetic take on clipless pedals

So-called "clipless" bicycle pedals, in which a steel cleat in the sole of the rider's shoe clicks in and out of a mechanism in the pedal, are very popular with cyclists – they maximize pedaling efficiency, plus they help keep riders' feet from accidentally slipping off the pedals when going over rough terrain. Some riders, however, find them too difficult to quickly snap out of. Additionally, they don't work well with regular, non-cleated footwear. That's why Salt Lake City-based mechanical engineer David Williams has created the MagLOCK bike pedal. Read More

Music

MOD Duo virtual pedalboard stomp heading to the US

The MOD system from Brazil's Portalmod was born of a desire to break free from the confines of carefully considered manufacturer-supplied digital effects for guitar and bass, and sail into the vast uncharted territory of independent developer-generated plug-ins. The hardware features its own mini computing system capable of wirelessly receiving user-customized virtual pedalboards configured via a browser-based interface. Having sold out of its original Quadra model, the company is currently making plans to release its next product, the MOD Duo, in the US.Read More

Bicycles

Click-in FlyPedal adapters let cyclists leave their cleats at home

Whether you're a biker who values the comfort of platform pedals or you favor the efficiency only the clipless variety can offer, there will likely have been times when you wished you had the best of both worlds. FlyPedals are adapters that can turn almost any clipless pedal into a flat surface for regular shoes, meaning there's no need to trod around on those awkward cleats when you're only making a quick trip to the shops. Read More

Bicycles

Spring-mounted BIUS1 bike pedals move to keep your joints happy

When we walk or run, our feet are able to land on the ground in whatever orientation makes life easiest for our hips, knees and ankles. When we're on a bike, however, our feet are at least somewhat held in place against the pedals. This can damage our leg joints, if they're forced to move in a stressful fashion. Germany's BioConform is now offering what it claims is a solution, in the form of its adaptable BIUS1 pedals.Read More

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