more top stories »


— Robotics

New technique for mass-producing microbots inspired by pop-up books and origami

Inspired by origami and children's pop-up books, Harvard engineers have pioneered a means of mass-producing bee-sized flying microrobots. The breakthrough mechanizes the already state-of-the art process of making Harvard's Mobee robots by hand, by mass producing flat assemblies by the sheet which can be folded and assembled in a single movement. The technique, which cunningly exploits existing machinery for making printed circuit boards, can theoretically be applied to a multitude of electromechanical machines. Read More
— Children

Origami stroller folds up with the push of a button

Appropriately enough called the Origami, the new baby product from 4moms is billed as “the world’s first power-folding stroller.” This means that it will fold itself down into a compact car-trunkable bundle, at the press of a button – another press gets it to open back up again. Evidently, however, that one feature just isn’t enough. It also has running lights and headlights, plus it will charge your cell phone. There’s no word yet on whether or not in can perform diaper changes. Read More
— Architecture

Origami Cave puts a stylish spin on emergency shelter

Australian architecture firm LAVA exhibited its inhabitable "Origami Cave" as part of The Emergency Shelter exhibition, which was held in Sydney earlier this month. The exhibition featured architects from around the globe including Ateliers Jean Nouvel, PTW Architects, Tonkin Zulaikha Greer, Cox, Koichi Takada Architects, Sou Fujimoto and Terunobu Fujimori. Each architect was asked to create a shelter that would not only protect people from the elements during an emergency situation, but would also provide a space that was secure and comfortable in the aftermath of a disaster. Read More
— Children

The self-folding Origami stroller: a cool name for a compact kid carrier

When did baby strollers get so high-tech? The Origami stroller power-folds itself open and shut at the touch of a button and has a built-in generator that charges the battery with every step you take. You can even choose to add options like powered speakers for your MP3 player, daytime running lights, or an adapter to charge your mobile phone. You want more features? Well read on… Read More
— Inventors and Remarkable People

Art meets science: Origami takes a great leap forward through old-school mathematics

Robert Lang laughs in the face of your paper crane. This former NASA engineer and Ph.D in Physics has spent the last seven years as a professional Origami expert after using computer algorithms and ridiculous folding skills to come up with some of the most mind-bending paper art we've ever seen. One sheet of uncut paper in Lang's hands can become a beetle, a dinosaur, an elk or an organist sitting at a keyboard. Using his freeware computer software, he can show you how to make just about anything you like. And through his theories on the mathematics of folding, he has come to find himself consulting on a range of fascinating projects that extend the art into practical and industrial uses - his advanced techniques have been used to pack automobile airbags and even fold up the lens of a space telescope for transport and deployment. Amazing stuff. Read More