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Obituaries

— Inventors and Remarkable People Feature

Pioneering astronaut Neil Armstrong dies aged 82

Neil Armstrong, the test pilot, aerospace engineer, university professor, United States Naval Aviator and American astronaut, has died at the age of 82 in Cincinnati, Ohio. His death was due to complications resulting from recent cardiovascular procedures carried out to relieve blocked arteries. He will forever be remembered by the history books as the first man to step foot on the Moon, the defining moment for a generation and inspiration to the generations that followed. Read More

Iconic sci-fi author Ray Bradbury dies at 91

Science fiction has lost one of its great heroes. It was revealed today that widely revered author Ray Bradbury passed away in his Los Angeles home on Tuesday at the age of 91. Bradbury's groundbreaking works, such as Fahrenheit 451 and The Martian Chronicles, influenced the science fiction genre as a whole and placed him among the ranks of Isaac Asimov and Arthur C. Clark. Read More

Vale Ferdinand Porsche - designer of the Porsche 911

Ferdinand Alexander Porsche, Grandson of the founder of Porsche, the designer of the Porsche 911, the founder of the Porsche Design studio and the architect of Porsche design culture, passed away yesterday, April 5 in Salzburg, aged 76. His design credo was that “design must be functional and functionality has to be translated visually into aesthetics, without gags that have to be explained first.” Some of his other well known statements on design include, “a coherently designed product requires no adornment; it should be enhanced by its form alone”, and “Good design should be honest.” Vale F.A. Porsche. Read More
— Inventors and Remarkable People

Pioneering audio engineer Owsley 'Bear' Stanley dies at 76

By - March 14, 2011 0 Pictures
Owsley “Bear” Stanley, pioneering audio engineer for the Grateful Dead, died in a car crash near his home in Australia on March 13. The sound designer, artist, and counterculture icon was perhaps best known for producing massive amounts of LSD during the psychedelic 1960s. But it was his groundbreaking sound work that may have the most lasting effect on rock musicians and audiences. Read More
— Good Thinking

Vale Robert Adler, 1913-2007 - TV Remote Control Co-Inventor

By - February 16, 2007 2 Pictures
February 17, 2007 The man who invented the remote control for the television, Dr. Robert Adler, died this week, giving us a timely reminder of just how fast technology is progressing. Dr. Adler's "Space Command" ultrasonic remote control for TV sets was introduced by Zenith in 1956 and two years later saw him win the 1958 Outstanding Technical Achievement Award of the Institute of Radio Engineers (now the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers or IEEE) for his "original work on ultrasonic remote controls" for television. Though he was best known as co-inventor of the wireless remote control for television , along with fellow Zenith engineer Eugene Polley), Adler was responsible for a large number of significant scientific contributions to the electronics industry, including landmark inventions in sophisticated specialized communications equipment. Read More
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