Highlights from the 2014 LA Auto Show

NTT Docomo

The Yubi Navi concept aims to make on-foot navigation more intuitive (Photo: Stephen Cleme...

Anyone who’s walked down the street using their smartphone for navigation will know that it’s not an ideal solution. While the service itself is invaluable, the need to constantly keep glancing down at the display to check you’re heading in the correct direction can be more than a little tedious. NTT Domoco’s Yubi Navi is a prototype device that looks to simplify on-foot navigation, replacing visual, on-screen prompts with subtle, tactile cues.  Read More

The Pioneer rearview mirror telematics unit installs over the existing rearview mirror

Digital gadgetry for cars is progressing by leaps and bounds, which is great – except when they your car doesn't have them. Japan's Pioneer Corporation has developed one way to keep up with the high-tech motoring Joneses in the form of its rearview mirror telematics unit – a wireless information module that fits over a car's original rearview mirror.  Read More

The portable prototype that detects if you're burning fat by analyzing your breath (Photo:...

While there's no shortage of breathalyzers capable of detecting if you’ve had one too many drinks, a prototype device developed by researchers at NTT DOCOMO Research Laboratories analyzes your breath to detect if your body is burning fat. Besides letting users know if that exercise regime is actually shedding some pounds, its creators say the portable sensor could be helpful for diabetics and those trying to lose weight manage their daily diet.  Read More

NEC's Medias X N-06E is the world's first smartphone with water cooling

The phrase “the phones are running hot” has the potential for a double meaning in the smartphone age, with increasingly processor-intensive apps being used on mobile devices. Desktop computers make use of water cooling to keep their CPUs from overheating, so why can’t smartphones? Why not, indeed. NEC has done just that with the Medias X N-06E, the world’s first water-cooled smartphone.  Read More

LG's Optimus G Pro is heading to Japanese carrier NTT Docomo

LG's high-end Optimus G has sold over one million units, and LG passed Apple as the number two phone maker (including feature phones) in the U.S. Its next move? If the Japanese market is any indication, it will be an upgraded version of its flagship, the Optimus G Pro.  Read More

Fujitsu has released the new flagship ARROWS Tab F-05E 10.1-inch, 1920 x 1200 resolution t...

Fujitsu has announced the immediate availability of its new ARROWS Tab F-05E 10.1-inch tablet. Unfortunately for most of us, the slim, water- and dust-resistant, better-than-HD resolution Android 4.0 mobile computing unit is being released through NTT Docomo in Japan only.  Read More

The Windows 7 F-07C mobile phone from Fujitsu - a smartphone mode and a PC mode in one dev...

Fujitsu has launched what is claimed to be the world's smallest Windows PC / smartphone. Available only in Japan at the time of writing, the new F-07C phone has two modes of operation - one which gives users all we've come to expect from a modern smartphone, and another that launches a full version of Windows 7 to offer personal computing in the palm of your hand. It's powered by an Intel Atom processor, has system memory and solid state storage, and benefits from a slide-out tactile keyboard.  Read More

LG's Optimus Pad will be available for pre-order on March 15 in Japan, in cooperation with...

If the 7-inch display on HTC's Flyer is not quite big enough, but Samsung's 10.1-inch Galaxy Tab is just a little too big, then LG's Optimus Pad could just fit the bill. Said to offer more comfortable one-handed portability, the Tegra 2-powered tablet with stereoscopic cameras is about to make its public debut in Japan.  Read More

The eye-controlled earphones developed by DoCoMo could revolutionize the way we control ou...

The Japanese wireless carrier NTT DoCoMo has recently developed and demonstrated a peculiar pair of headphones that can precisely detect a user's eye movements without a camera, and use those movements to control electronic devices such as mobile phones and portable music players. DoCoMo started working on this idea back in 2008 by adapting an electrooculogram (EOG), a medical device used for measuring eye response, to their purposes. An EOG works on the principle that the human cornea has a positive electrical charge. As the user looks to the left or right, the charge shifts in the space between the user's ears – a change that can be easily detected by appropriate sensors.  Read More

Eyeball-tracking earbuds let you control your MP3 player with a glance

How the heck does it do that? Japanese telecom giant NTT DoCoMo has used the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona to demo a very cool new handsfree interface you can use to control an MP3 player using gestures you make with your eyeballs. Sensors in the earbuds themselves measure changes in electrical potential to convert your eye movements to iPod commands. Fascinating stuff... and while using it on an MP3 player might seem a bit naff, there's probably a range of other situations where handsfree, voice-free control options like this could be really useful.  Read More

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