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North Carolina State University

— Health and Wellbeing

Ultrasound pulses could replace daily injections for diabetics

By - November 21, 2013 1 Picture
There could be hope for diabetics who are tired of giving themselves insulin injections on a daily basis. Researchers at North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill are developing a system in which a single injection of nanoparticles could deliver insulin internally for days at a time – with a little help from pulses of ultrasound. Read More
— Science

New tech could beam power from roadside stations to passing electric cars

By - November 14, 2013 1 Picture
Among the concepts put forth for decreasing the range anxiety associated with electric cars, one is to embed electrical coils within the asphalt. This would allow vehicles to wirelessly draw power from the road as they traveled, although it would also involve having to tear up existing roads to install those coils. An alternative could be on its way, however. Scientists at North Carolina State University are developing a system in which power could be transmitted from stationary roadside stations to mobile receiver coils in cars passing by. Read More
— Science

New software could allow cyborg insects to map buildings

By - October 16, 2013 1 Picture
Living remote-control cockroaches are now a thing. They actually exist. Besides wowing people and sparking ethics debates, however, the cyborg insects may ultimately have some very worthwhile applications. A team led by North Carolina State University's Dr. Edgar Lobaton has brought one of those applications a step closer to reality, by developing software that would allow "swarms" of the cockroaches to map hazardous environments such as collapsed buildings. Read More
— Science

New thin film increases efficiency of stacked solar cells

By - September 11, 2013 1 Picture
Researchers at North Carolina State University have developed a new system for strengthening the connections between stacked solar cells which could improve the overall efficiency of concentrated photovoltaic technology and reduce the cost of solar energy production. The hardened connections could theoretically enable these cells to operate at concentrations of up to 70,000 suns while minimizing wasted energy. Read More
— Robotics

Electrically-charged hydrogel has applications for soft robotics and biomedical fields

By - August 4, 2013 5 Pictures
Soft robotics is a quickly emerging field that takes a lot of inspiration from marine creatures like squids and starfish. A light-controlled hydrogel was recently developed that could be used for control of these new robotic devices, but now researchers at North Carolina State University are taking the development of soft robotic devices to a new level with electrically-charged hydrogels. Read More
— Science

Metallic bubble wrap could be popping into consumer products

By - July 9, 2013 1 Picture
Chances are that you wouldn’t use ordinary plastic bubble wrap in a helmet, automobile body panel, airplane wing edge or computer case. However, those are some of the applications that are being suggested for a new type of bubble wrap – one that’s made from metal. It’s reportedly lighter and stronger than regular sheet metal, so don’t go expecting to pop it with your fingers. Read More
— Robotics

Xbox Kinect used to steer cockroach biobots

By - June 28, 2013 2 Pictures
There has been no shortage of uses floated for Microsoft's Xbox Kinect that go beyond the realm of gaming, from 3D modeling to docking satellites and even garbage catching. Now we can add controlling cyborg cockroaches to the list. As part of ongoing research into piloting biobots, researchers at North Carolina State University have used the video game technology to put roaches on autopilot. Read More
— Science

Thin-film solar cells could become more efficient – thanks to moths' eyes

By - May 17, 2013 1 Picture
Because moths need to use every little bit of light available in order to see in the dark, their eyes are highly non-reflective. This quality has been copied in a film that can be applied to solar cells, which helps keep sunlight from being reflecting off of them before it can be utilized. Now, a new moth eye-inspired film may further help solar cells become more efficient. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Injectable nanoparticles maintain normal blood-sugar levels for up to 10 days

By - May 5, 2013 1 Picture
Aside from the inconvenience of injecting insulin multiple times a day, type 1 diabetics also face health risks if the dosage level isn’t accurate. A new approach developed by US researchers has the potential to overcome both of these problems. The method relies on a network of nanoscale particles that once injected into the body, can maintain normal blood sugar levels for more than a week by releasing insulin when blood-sugar levels rise. Read More
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