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Night Vision


— Motorcycles

Russian motorbike concept is BIG on safety

By - April 30, 2010 17 Pictures
The makers of what has been described as the “world’s greatest weapon”, the Russian Kalashnikov machine gun, were also pretty handy at constructing motorbikes, selling around 11 million of them since their formation in 1927. For many years, this Soviet motorbike factory ran second only to Japan in production numbers. One of its most popular bikes was the 1929 Izh-1, and this is a 2012 take on the motorcycle by designer Igor Chak. The concept design comes with more safety features than 10 Volvos combined and is aimed at making riding on the highways and byways safer than walking. Read More
— Digital Cameras

AstroScope gives your DSLR night vision

By - August 13, 2009 8 Pictures
The AstroScope, from night vision manufacturer Electrophysics, is a modular adapter that adds night-vision capability to DSLR cameras and camcorders. Designed for use by the military, law enforcement, news agencies, and well-heeled enthusiasts, the AstroScope night vision adapter fits between the camera body and the lens to capture high-resolution images at night and in low-light situations that are otherwise too dark for standard digital cameras. Read More
— Motorcycles

Kawasaki set to debut night vision, helmet-mounted heads-up displays and collision avoidance technology

By - June 7, 2009 12 Pictures
KAWASAKI'S 1400 GTR is already one of the most technologically-advanced bikes on the planet – with variable valve timing, keyless ignition and tyre pressure sensors as standard – but the firm is preparing a whole new generation of ground breaking technology for the next-generation GTR. Heading up the technological onslaught comes a system that until now has been in the preserve of only the world's most expensive cars; night vision. Read More
— Automotive

TAG HEUER Night Vision eyeglasses for safer driving

By - August 6, 2008 5 Pictures
August 7, 2008 Driving at night is far more dangerous than driving in daylight according to the statistics. Though only 10% of road miles are driven in the dark, 48% of road fatalities occur at night. That’s primarily because at night our pupils dilate, and we become short-sighted, though glare, halos, and reduced peripheral vision all contribute to ocular tiredness. TAG Heuer has released a set of ophthalmic Night Vision glasses specifically designed to correct dark-induced myopia, reduce glare, contrast the dark blue surroundings without changing colour perception and ultimately offer safer driving after dark. Read More
— Digital Cameras

Zonet to launch night-vision, motion detection IP security cameras

By - February 14, 2008 3 Pictures
Zonet is releasing two Internet Protocol security cameras in November. The $220 7630 and $320 wireless 7630W both have built in web servers with individual IP addresses that can connect directly to a user’s network and be accessed from a standard web browser.February 15, 2008 Zonet has announced the upcoming release two new portable lP security cameras featuring motion detection and night-vision capabilities. The USD$220 7630 model and its USD$320 wireless counterpart (7630W) both have built in web servers with individual IP addresses that can connect directly to a user’s network and be accessed from a standard web browser. Read More
— Military

BAE to develop next-generation night-vision goggles

By - September 24, 2007 2 Pictures
September 25, 2007 U.S. army soldiers will be the recipients of enhanced night vision goggles that use digital imagery to improve mobility and situational awareness under all lighting conditions, overcoming battlefield obscurants that would generally hinder vision. Under development by BAE systems as part of the Enhanced Night Vision Goggle program for the U.S. defense forces the helmet-mounted system will digitally combine video imagery from a low-light-level visible sensor and an uncooled long-wave infrared sensor onto a single color display located in front of the soldier's eye. Read More
— Automotive

BMW incorporates thermal imaging into newly available Night Vision driver assistance system

By - August 22, 2006 18 Pictures
August 23, 2006 Thermal Imaging has long been used by the military to see in the dark in mission-critical situations, so it’s not surprising that it is being used in BMW’s new Night Vision driver assistance system. In using thermal imaging as the basis for the system, BMW engineers have opted for an approach that places greater focus on detecting people and animals at danger. Objects which radiate heat are shown particularly bright and are therefore drawn to the attention of the driver. In urban areas, lighting is usually sufficient for drivers to recognise dangers with the naked eye, but BMW Night Vision is most effective on country roads where pedestrians, cyclists and animals can be detected earlier. The system also has advantages on unlit streets or dark courtyards and poorly lit car parks. Australian accident statistics show that 45 per cent of fatal road accidents occur at night, even though more than two thirds of all driving is done during the day, so the new system addresses a serious issue - driving at night represents a significant potential danger. The Night Vision system is now available as an option in the BMW 7 Series, 5 Series and 6 Series. The thermal imaging camera covers a range of up to 300 metres or almost 1,000 feet ahead of the car, almost twice as far as near infrared systems on the Mercedes S Class and the Lexus LX470. Great image gallery with video. Read More
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