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Network

— Digital Cameras

Cerevo's live-to-Ustream camera is now live at Akihabara, 24/7

By - July 18, 2010 16 Pictures
Japan camera-maker Cerevo has started a 24-hour live Ustream feed from Akihabara, in cooperation with a company in the area, Aisan Electronic. Recently Cerevo has been capitalizing on the growing popularity of Ustream live-streaming in Japan since Softbank's investment in the web service. By creating their 'networked camera', the Cerevo Camera Live, which is especially tailored for live-streaming, the company rides the coattails of a public increasingly interested in broadcasting on the web. Read More
— Urban Transport

Sensor system alerts drivers to free parking spots

By - July 8, 2010 3 Pictures
It’s a frustrating situation. You’re aimlessly circling the blocks, hoping to stumble across a free parking space, but with no clue as to where such a space might be. Well, as we so often like to say here at Gizmag, “A new invention could change that.” Researchers from Spain’s Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) have helped develop a system that detects free parking spots, then guides drivers to the closest ones using a process that’s reportedly better than GPS. Read More
— Computers

New software lets PCs work while they sleep

By - June 24, 2010 5 Pictures
A particularly troubling aspect of enterprise computer deployment is the need for end user machines to remain switched on day and night. Fully on mind you, not in low power sleep mode. Computer scientists from the University of California, San Diego have developed a software solution which allows PCs to remain on the network even when placed in sleep mode at the end of a working day. The software creates a virtual representation of the computer on the server to handle many of the common overnight tasks, only waking up the physical machine at pre-programmed commands or when it encounters something that it can't deal with itself. Read More
— Science

Wonder why we don't crash like computers? Yale explains

By - May 11, 2010 1 Picture
Whether right or for wrong, the human brain is often compared to a computer, and vice-versa. They both receive data, process it, store it, and output new data. Unlike computers, however, the human brain doesn’t crash. Yes, people have nervous breakdowns, but that has more to do with psychological stress than with data management. Now, researchers from Yale University have figured out why our brains succeed where computers fail. Read More
— Telecommunications

Transmission speeds of 100Mbps over 1km on existing copper networks

By - April 22, 2010 1 Picture
In an ideal world we would all access the Internet over fiber optic cables that reach right up to the front door to deliver blisteringly fast transmission speeds. Unfortunately, we don’t live in an ideal world and many of us are forced to rely on aging copper network infrastructure. Now, Alcatel-Lucent’s Bell Labs has demonstrated technology that boosts the transmission speeds over two copper pairs to 100Mbps over a distance of 1km. This could see such infrastructure given a new lease of life, satisfying consumer’s need for speed for some time to come. Read More
— Computers

Belkin includes apps with new 802.11n wireless routers

By - March 28, 2010 6 Pictures
The world is going app crazy and it's not restricted to the domain of mobile phones. Routers too, it seems, are not being left out. As well as embracing the 802.11n wireless protocol and simple three step setup, Belkin's latest router offerings also break into the world of applications with software that automatically detects and resolves network issues, a playlist music generator and an automated data backup program all leading the charge. Read More
— Telecommunications

Wireless optical system offers one gigabit per second transmission

By - January 28, 2010 3 Pictures
Sending and receiving data over a wireless network is generally undertaken via radio waves. But that's not the only method. Using the optical spectrum offers the advantage of better security and blisteringly fast transfer rates to boot. Engineers from Pennsylvania State University have now succeeded in moving data outside the usual line of sight restrictions at speeds of over one gigabit per second, more than double that achieved by Siemens recently. Read More
— Science

NEPTUNE Canada - world's largest cabled seafloor observatory goes live

By - January 26, 2010 10 Pictures
Deep-sea research is great and everything, but man, those submersibles can get pretty cramped. The other, bigger problem is that it requires going off and traveling on a ship, which is costly and can therefore only be done a few times a year. Fortunately, however, there’s now a way of obtaining real-time undersea data without leaving your office. NEPTUNE Canada, the world’s largest and most advanced cabled seafloor observatory, officially started going live to the Internet last December, giving anyone with an Internet connection free access to what will become an absolute mountain of data from the bottom of the sea. Read More
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