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— Computers

Transporter backs up your files off-site, on other peoples' hard drives

When it comes to backing up your files, there are generally two approaches ... you can put them on a physical device such as a hard drive, or you can upload them to the cloud. Hard drives can be lost or destroyed, however, while cloud-based services usually charge monthly fees for larger amounts of data – plus, not everyone feels comfortable trusting their files to faceless corporations. Well, that’s where the Transporter comes in. It allows you to store your files off-site, on the hard drives of people whom you know and trust. Read More
— Home Entertainment

RED shocks with Odemax 4K distribution platform and REDRAY home player

Serial disruptor RED is at it again. While the announcement of a REDRAY player capable of outputting 4K (4096 x 2160 pixels) moving images had been expected for some time, the accompanying infrastructure that’s being put in place comes as a major shock. RED, in partnership with new venture Odemax, is setting up an alternative to the highly regulated and protected film distribution networks of the big studios – and anybody can join. If they can pull it off it could be nothing less than a revolution. Read More
— Automotive

Volvo joins the CAR 2 CAR Communication Consortium

Automakers such as Honda, GM, Audi, BMW and Daimler have already done it, now Volvo has too – it’s joined the CAR 2 CAR Communication Consortium. The aim of the project is to establish a standard system that would allow vehicles to wirelessly communicate with one another, regardless of make or model. If the system works as planned, it should reduce accidents, improve traffic flow, and just generally make driving a more enjoyable experience. Read More

LG's "Zero Client" monitors can work without a CPU, memory, or even storage

Just days after launching its own cloud storage service, LG has announced the "P Series," a new line of cloud monitors aimed at company networks. Besides the monitor itself, its "zero client" work stations need only a LAN cable (which doubles as power supply), a keyboard and a mouse to work properly, cutting down dramatically on costs and allowing companies to ditch desktop and laptop computers altogether. Read More
— Good Thinking

Matternet would use UAVs to deliver supplies to remote villages

Across Africa, along with other parts of the world, there are many villages that are inaccessible by road for at least part of the year. The only reasonably fast way of getting medicine and other essential goods to these locations is to fly them in by conventional aircraft. Such an approach can be costly, however, and requires the services of a trained pilot. Matternet, a startup company currently based out of Silicon Valley's Singularity University is proposing an alternative - a network of ground stations for small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), which would inexpensively deliver payloads to remote communities. Read More
— Telecommunications

New system could make censorship of Internet sites virtually impossible

Chinese citizens could once again enjoy LOL Cats on YouTube - as well as content critical of the communist government - if a new system developed by researchers at the University of Michigan (U-M) and the University of Waterloo (UW) in Canada were implemented. The researchers claim the system, called Telex, would thwart Internet censorship and make it virtually impossible for a censoring government to block individual sites by essentially turning the entire web into a proxy server. Read More
— Telecommunications

IEEE 802.22 wireless network standard to offer 62 miles of range

The IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) has announced the completion of the IEEE 802.22 wireless network standard, which has been in the works since 2004. Utilizing unused white spaces between channels in the TV frequency spectrum, the 802.22 standard will serve Wireless Regional Area Networks (WRANs), which are meant to bring broadband access to sparsely populated rural areas, as well as to developing countries. Read More
— Electronics

'War Texting' lets hackers gain access to cars via GSM networks

Cellular-based automotive roadside assistance services like GM’s OnStar and BMW Assist allow remote unlocking of vehicles by communicating with remote servers via standard mobile networks. Now a pair of security systems engineers have managed to prove it takes just a few hours of clever reverse engineering to crack the in-car cellular network-based technology to gain access to vehicles. They call their method “War Texting.” Read More