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— Automotive

Hudway app turns your phone into a head-up display

It was just this July that we heard about Garmin's HUD. It's a portable device that sits on the dashboard of the user's car, working with their smartphone to project a head-up display (HUD) onto the inside of their windshield. Russian startup Hudway has taken that same basic approach with its self-named free app, except that it utilizes just the phone – no projector is required. Read More
— Mobile Technology

Coin-sized Retrievor solar-powered GPS tracking device

If you've ever wondered where you left the laptop or how your dog came home smelling like a frog pond, then a GPS tracking device might seem like a good idea. The trick is to find one small enough to be practical and doesn't need its batteries replaced every day. The Retrievor RET-100 is a self-contained, solar-powered GPS tracker no wider than a US quarter that is looking to find a way to market via a crowdfunding campaign. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Garmin D2 pilot watch promises an avionics center for your wrist

While the jury is still out on whether or not we are entering the era of the smartwatch, scuba divers, yachtsmen and airplane pilots would agree that the wristwatch hasn't been completely supplanted by the mobile phone. Garmin’s D2 pilot watch puts the emphasis on utility by providing pilots with navigation and avionics readouts at the touch of a button. Read More
— Bicycles

Hammerhead tells cyclists where they can go

It's becoming more and more common for cyclists to find their way around using navigation apps on bike-mounted smartphones ... but it's not a perfect setup. For one thing, those phones get shaken around a lot. Additionally, it's risky for cyclists to keep glancing down at the screen, plus keeping that screen constantly awake uses up a lot of battery life. The Hammerhead offers an alternative. It's a water- and shock-proof bar-mounted device that relays simple navigational cues via easy-to-see LEDs. Read More
— Automotive

Pioneer launches NavGate HUD for smartphone navigation apps

Pioneer has unveiled its augmented reality NavGate HUD (head-up display), that projects information onto vehicle windscreens at a size equivalent to a 30-inch monitor viewed from about three meters out. Using a Digital Light Processing (DLP) projector attached to the vehicle's sun visor, a driver is able to see information displayed on the windscreen just above the horizon. The NavGate HUD works together with the CoPilot and iGO primo smartphone apps to display directional instructions, places of interest, hazards and other relevant information. Read More
— Outdoors

Trimble TopoCharger converts an iPhone into an outdoor GPS

Smartphones have all but replaced standalone GPS units for basic car and foot navigation in cities and on highways, but without apps like the ViewRanger, they aren't equipped to guide you around forests, mountains and trails. The new Trimble TopoCharger brings another such app, along with a full set of topographical maps and a full-sized back-up battery. Pop this case on, and the iPhone transforms into an outdoor GPS. Read More
— Marine

University of Texas team takes control of a yacht by spoofing its GPS

Civilization depends on the Global Positioning System for everything from precision armaments to finding the location of the nearest pizza shop. Indeed, access to GPS's strengths and capabilities has grown so fast that little concern about its weaknesses has penetrated the public consciousness. Fortunately, assistant professor Todd Humphreys' team at the University of Texas at Austin continues to arrange splashy demonstrations of GPS spoofing. His latest is to covertly alter the course of an oceangoing yacht. Read More
— Robotics

2013 International Aerial Robotics Competition tests student-built espionage robots

For the past 23 years, the International Aerial Robotics Competition has challenged college teams with missions requiring complex autonomous robotic behaviors that are often beyond the capabilities of even the most sophisticated military robots. This year's competition, which was held in China and the United States over the past week, saw the team from Tsinghua University in Beijing successfully complete the current mission – an elaborate espionage operation known as Mission Six that was first proposed in 2010. Read More