Highlights from the 2014 LA Auto Show

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The Locata system installed at the White Sands Missile range

As anyone who's tried to use GPS indoors can tell you, global positioning systems have their limitations. For them to work properly, you have to be outdoors and you need a clear view of the sky. If you’re in the military, you also have to be sure that the enemy isn't jamming the satellite signal. For this reason, the US Air Force has awarded Canberra-based firm Locata a “sole source” contract to install a ground-based version of GPS over 2,500 square miles (6,475 sq/km) of the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico as part of a program to develop a practical supplement to GPS.  Read More

KAIST researchers have developed an indoor positioning system based on 'Wi-Fi fingerprints...

Researchers at the Korean Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) have developed a new indoor positioning system that makes it possible to build a Wi-Fi radio map that does not require GPS signals. It's claimed to be an improvement on Wi-Fi Positioning Systems, that rely on both GPS and Wi-Fi signals.  Read More

Hyundai will use Google Maps APIs in its Blue Link telematics platform

The seamless vehicle technology previewed by the Connectivity Concept may take a few years to become reality, but Hyundai's in-vehicle tech is getting incrementally more advanced. The Korean automaker announced today that it will integrate Google Maps application programming interfaces (APIs) into its U.S.-based Blue Link infotainment systems, underpinning a smoother navigational experience for drivers.  Read More

A standalone Google Maps app is set to launch for iOS sometime today

One of the most embarrassing chapters in Apple's history has been covered with a Band-Aid. In what can only be a bittersweet milestone for iOS, the Google Maps app is now available in the App Store as a standalone app.  Read More

Apple Maps shows the town of Mildura some 70 km (44 miles) south of its actual location

Having already attracted widespread criticism, the inaccuracy of Apple Maps has now prompted police in Victoria, Australia, to issue a warning about using the iOS 6 app. The warning comes after a number of motorists seeking directions to the town of Mildura became stranded after they were directed into a National Park by the problem-plagued app.  Read More

Nokia's new service is an alternative to Apple Maps

The iOS version of Nokia's cloud-based mapping service has been released on Apple's App Store. The service boasts a number of compelling features and undoubtedly aims to capitalize on the problems iPhone and iPad owners have encountered while using Cupertino's own Maps app.  Read More

X-ray pulsars could help interstellar spaceships like this Bussard ramjet to navigate (Ima...

The European Space Agency (ESA) wants to know if it’s possible to use dead stars as a navigational aid for traveling in deep space. To answer that question, ESA has contracted Britain’s National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and the University of Leicester to investigate whether pulsars can serve as navigational beacons in the far-flung reaches of the outer Solar System or interstellar space.  Read More

Studying the behavior of bees might lead to better, much more flexible ways to deal with p...

By studying the behavior of bees, a group of researchers at Queen Mary University of London has documented and modeled the way in which the insects can fly from flower to flower and then come back to their hives expending the least amount of time and energy. The findings might lead to better, much more flexible ways to deal with problems ranging from building faster computer networks to creating more powerful microchips.  Read More

Building at the University of Chicago look like they are melting on Apple's maps app

As we noted in our iOS6 overview last week, customers and critics have been up in arms over Apple's new maps application and the reports of inaccuracies and misplaced cities and towns continue to flow.  Read More

The NAVVIS interface on a user's smartphone

While we’ve pretty much got to the point where we take GPS-enabled navigation systems for granted, there’s one rather prominent place where they can’t access the necessary satellites – indoors. A number of projects have taken on the challenge of indoor navigation, incorporating things like accelerometers, “invisible” landmarks, rapidly flickering lights, and magnetic fields. The experimental new NAVVIS system, however, utilizes a database of photographs.  Read More

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