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Nanoparticles

— Medical

Magnetically-directed nanoparticles could help heal broken bones

By - November 24, 2014 1 Picture
When a bone is severely broken in the human body, or a bone-fused prosthesis is implanted, a bone graft is also often required to ensure a solid mechanical repair. However, a graft that removes bone from another area of the body can be a painful and invasive procedure, and the mechanical stimulation required for continued bone regeneration in post-operative therapy becomes problematic if a patient is severely immobilized. To address these problems, researchers have discovered that coating magnetic nanoparticles with proteins and then directing them magnetically to the site of the injury can help stimulate stem cells to regenerate bone. Read More
— Medical

Platelet-like nanoparticles improve on nature to stem the blood flow

By - November 20, 2014 2 Pictures
The skin is the body's first line of defense against infection. And when this barrier is broken, or an internal organ is ruptured, it is the process of coagulation, or clotting, which relies largely on blood cells called platelets, that seals the breach and stems the flow of blood. Researchers at UC Santa Barbara have now synthesized nanoparticles that mimic the form and function of platelets, but can do more than just accelerate the body's natural healing processes. Read More
— Medical

Could liposomes be the answer to our antibiotic crisis?

By - November 3, 2014 1 Picture
It’s no secret we are facing an antibiotic crisis. Overuse has caused widespread antibiotic resistance, leading the World Health Organisation to declare we are "headed for a post-antibiotic era, in which common infections and minor injuries which have been treatable for decades can once again kill." Scientists from the University of Bern have developed a new non-antibiotic compound that treats severe bacterial infections and avoids the problem of bacterial resistance. Read More
— Science

Seaweed could provide a safer alternative to antibacterial silver

By - September 30, 2014 2 Pictures
Silver nanoparticles are very effective at killing bacteria, finding use in everything from water filters to non-smelly clothing. That said, there are some major concerns regarding the effects that those particles may have on human health and on the environment. Among other things, it has been suggested that they cause cell death, and compromise the immune system. Now, however, scientists at Sweden's KTH Royal Institute of Technology have come up with what could be a less harmful alternative – red algae. Read More
— Environment

Nanoparticle coating cleans cashmere with light

By - September 2, 2014 1 Picture
Cashmere is a fine quality wool whose delicate nature generally means a trip to the dry cleaner is required to deal with any stains on an article of clothing made from the material. But now researchers at City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has developed a self-cleaning coating made up of nanoparticles that removes stains from cashmere by exposing the garment to light. Read More
— Medical

Multi-tasking nanoparticle both seeks and destroys cancerous cells

By - August 27, 2014 1 Picture
Nanoparticles hold great potential as a way of both detecting cancer cells and delivering the drugs to treat them. One hurdle that has proven difficult to overcome is incorporating these properties into one multi-purpose device, as nanoparticles are generally engineered with either goal in mind. In what appears a promising development, researchers at the University of California Davis (UC Davis) Cancer Center have created a multi-tasking nanoparticle shown to be effective both in the diagnosis of a tumor and attacking its cells – a flexibility that could lead to new treatment options for cancer patients. Read More
— Science

Gold nanomotors clocked at a record 150,000 RPM

By - July 23, 2014 1 Picture
Scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have discovered that a gold nanorod submerged in water and exposed to high-frequency ultrasound waves can spin at an incredible speed of 150,000 RPM, about ten times faster than the previous record. The advance could lead to powerful nanomotors with important applications in medicine, high-speed machining, and the mixing of materials. Read More
— Science

Sponge-like structure generates steam using lowest concentration of solar energy yet

By - July 22, 2014 2 Pictures
Researchers working at MIT’s Department of Mechanical Engineering claim to have produced a sponge-like substance that helps convert water to steam using sunlight one-hundredth as bright as that required by conventional steam-producing solar generators. A composite of graphite flakes layered on a bed of carbon foam, the new material is reported to convert as much as 85 percent of received solar energy into steam. Read More
— Medical

"Nanojuice" lets scientists see the gut in action

By - July 7, 2014 1 Picture
When someone suffers from a gastrointestinal disorder such as celiac disease, Crohn's disease or irritable bowel syndrome, it's standard practice for doctors to take a look at the state of their small intestine. This is typically done by having them drink a rather unpleasant-tasting barium solution, and then submitting to x-rays, an MRI or ultrasound. According to scientists at New York's University at Buffalo, however, all of those imaging techniques have serious shortcomings. Their proposed solution? A stiff drink of nanojuice. Read More
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