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Museum

— Holiday Destinations

All aboard London's subterranean Mail Rail

It's now over a century (101 years, to be exact) since ground was first struck to build the London Post Office Railway, an underground tunnel system that transported the bulk of the city’s letters and parcels between sorting and delivery stations. When it opened in 1927 it was the world's first driverless, electrified railway, and operated up until 2003, when it closed due to financial reasons. There are now plans to turn it into a museum and part of the train line into a ride. Read More

Smithsonian Institution may be headed to London

For the first time in its 168 year history, the Smithsonian Institution may be "coming home," in a manner of speaking. Originally founded with funds from British scientist James Smithson, it has never established a longterm exhibition outside the United States. But recently unveiled plans for a new culture and arts center to be built at London’s Olympic Park site in the UK. Read More
— Architecture

Designs revealed for Helsinki Guggenheim

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation's 11-member jury announced its shortlisted designs for Helsinki's proposed Guggenheim museum this morning. A veritable gaggle of Guggenheims – some 1,715 submissions – were whittled down to just six concepts from relatively lesser-known architecture firms, which were no doubt hoping to emulate the renown of the two iconic Guggenheim buildings in Bilbao and NYC, by Frank Gehry and Frank Lloyd Wright, respectively. Read More
— Science

New method of conserving wood gets tested on historic ship artifacts

In 1545 Henry VIII’s flagship the Mary Rose sank suddenly under mysterious circumstances. In 1982, the rediscovered ship was raised to the surface in a remarkable feat of underwater archaeology that sparked decades of heroic preservation work. Now a team of scientists led by the University of Cambridge is working with the Mary Rose Trust conservation team to test a new way of conserving waterlogged wood in order to preserve the great ship and her cargo of history for later generations. Read More
— Science

Science Museum exhibit explores the Information Age

If the 19th and 20th centuries were the Transportation Age, then the 21st century is the Information Age. Like most other ages, it didn't suddenly leap into being with the arrival of the Web or the smartphone – it has a history going back more than 200 years. The Science Museum in London is exploring this history in a new permanent exhibit called "Information Age: Six Networks That Changed Our World," which was recently opened by Queen Elizabeth II when she sent the first tweet by a British monarch. Read More
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