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Mountain Bikes


— Bicycles

SussMyBike shows riders how to set their suspension

For many people who own a mountain bike with a suspension fork, the settings on that fork are either left as they were in the store, or just set to the manufacturer's suggested parameters. Setting them more specifically does make for a better riding experience, but not everyone knows to do so. That's why Scottish cyclist Alan Mason teamed up with partners at the Mountain Bike Centre of Scotland, Napier University and Edinburgh University to create SussMyBike. It analyzes your fork's performance, then tells you how it should be set up to better meet your needs.

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— Bicycles

AIM mountain bike stem can be set to three riding positions

Mountain bikes' handlebar stems are a bit of a compromise. They put the bars at a length and angle that are generally good for most types of riding, but that aren't necessarily ideal for any one. While adjustable-angle stems do exist, most still don't let you change the length. Well, that's why Spain's 3FStech created the AIM stem. With the push of a button, it lets riders switch between three bar angles and reach lengths.

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— Bicycles

Rungu's monstrous fat trike goes electric

If you want a fatbike that’ll get you noticed, the Rungu Juggernaut is a hard one to beat. Actually a fat trike that was originally designed to carry surfboards across loose sand, it’s presumably not always the easiest thing to pedal – particularly on loose terrain. That’s why its California-based designers have now come out with an electric version, which we spied at Interbike 2015.

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— Bicycles

Bees modular bike transforms and adapts to your riding

For generations, mountain bikers have had to make the sometimes difficult choice between affordable, nimble-climbing hardtails and fast, cushy full-suspension bikes. German company Altinsoy Manufaktur has a different idea. Its Bees Bike has a completely modular design that lets you quickly change over from hardtail to full suspension. You can also adjust sizing and positioning with ease.

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— Bicycles

Magura unveils wireless dropper post at Eurobike

Dropper seat posts are becoming increasingly common on mountain bikes – among other things, they allow the rider to drop the saddle down out of the way when they’re adjusting their riding position on steep descents, but then pop it back up again afterwards. They do, however, require yet one more cable to strung along (or inside of) the frame. At this year’s Eurobike show in Germany, Magura has presented an alternative – the Vyron eLECT, which is the world’s first commercially-available wireless dropper seat post.

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— Bicycles

Bionicon's e-ram mountain bike motor is light and low-profile

While hub motors may be quite common on commuter e-bikes, they’re not so popular on full-suspension electric mountain bikes. That’s because they add unsprung weight, which nobody wants. Various companies have responded by developing motors that are located in the middle of the bike, near the bottom bracket. These solve part of the problem, although they have to actually be built into the frame. That’s why Germany’s Bionicon has created the e-ram – it’s reportedly the world’s lightest mid-mount motor, and it could potentially be installed on existing mountain bikes.

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— Bicycles

MagLOCK takes another kick at magnetic clipless bike pedals

Last November we first heard about MagLOCK pedals – clipless mountain bike pedals that use magnets instead of springs to keep the rider's feet attached, and that can also be used as regular platform pedals. The product fell short of its crowdfunding goal, perhaps because the pedals were kind of clunky, but MagLOCK designer Dave Williams is now back on Kickstarter with a sleeker, lighter and less expensive version.

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— Bicycles Review

Review: Light & Motion Urban Trail 850 FC bike light is compact but packs a wallop

Thanks to continuing advances in LED and lithium battery technology, it's now not uncommon to see mountain bike headlights putting out 3,000 lumens or more. Most of these high-intensity lights incorporate two or three bulbs, however, requiring a separate battery pack to power them. With this in mind, we were intrigued when we heard that Light & Motion had declared its self-contained new Urban 850 Trail FC to be "the most powerful single-LED bike light that exists." We gave it a try and liked what it has to offer ... even if its claim may be a little hard to substantiate.

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