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Mobility


Urb-E squeezes onto personal mobility train

Compact personal mobility vehicles are a great option for commuters looking to solve the "last mile" problem. The latest such vehicle to hit the streets aimed at filling this need is the Urb-E from Urban Mobility, which claims it is the "world's most compact electric vehicle." Read More
— Urban Transport

JAC< foldable electric scooter for urban commuters

By - January 23, 2013 5 Pictures
LEEV Mobility, the Amsterdam-based company responsible for the Mantys electric golf vehicle, has gone from the fairway to the roadway for its second offering. The company's JAC< is an electric scooter that is designed to solve the first and last mile problem faced by urban commuters. A fully functional prototype has been constructed and LEEV has launched a crowdfunding campaign to get the JAC< on the road. Read More
— Architecture

"Shareway" presents a vision of transport infrastructure in 2030

By - January 21, 2013 25 Pictures
American-based studio Höweler + Yoon Architecture has developed an intriguing concept for modern urban infrastructure between Boston and Washington called "Boswash." Central to the design of this imagined mega-region is the firm's "Shareway" design – a bundled transport concept that seeks to redress the nightmare of the urban commute by connecting public and individual transport to a single artery along the 450 mile (724 km) route of the existing Interstate 95. Read More
— Robotics

Vanderbilt University steps into the exoskeleton market

By - October 31, 2012 3 Pictures
For people who are unable to walk under their own power, exoskeletons offer what is perhaps the next-best thing. Essentially “wearable robots,” the devices not only let their users stand, but they also move their legs for them, allowing them to walk. While groups such as Berkeley Bionics, NASA, Rex Bionics, and ReWalk are all working on systems, Nashville’s Vanderbilt University has just announced the development of its own exoskeleton. It is claimed to offer some important advantages over its competitors. Read More
— Good Thinking

Long-distance collaborators create inexpensive prosthetic finger

By - October 30, 2012 4 Pictures
When South African craftsman Richard Van As lost most of the fingers from his right hand in an industrial accident, he decided to try and create a prosthetic finger to regain some of his lost mobility. In order to bring this about, Richard recruited the help of Washington State native Ivan Owen, after being impressed with the latter's mechanical hand prop which he had posted on YouTube. The result could be a boon to amputees everywhere. Read More
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