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Mobile Phones

It's no secret that mobile phones are breeding grounds for bacteria. They're touched regularly, spoken into and passed around, as well as being constantly switched on and, therefore, constantly warm. Indeed, a report by the UK's Which magazine suggested that mobile phones can carry up to eighteen times more bacteria than a men's toilet flush. The newly-launched PhoneSoap Charger uses UV light to sanitize your phone while it's charging. Read More

The European Aviation Safety Agency is following in the footsteps of the US Federal Aviation Administration by easing restrictions on the use of Personal Electronic Devices (PEDs) by passengers during flights. Read More

Amongst the fawning and feting around the launch of the first Apple iPad in 2010, there were murmured questions about just what niche and purpose the device would fulfill. Turn the clock forward to 2013 and those murmurs have long since ceased, with the latest research from Gartner suggesting that the upward trajectory of the tablet market could see the number of units shipped overtake PCs in 2015. Read More

On Thursday, the US Department of Transportation’s Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) eased regulations against airline passengers using their Personal Electronic Devices (PED) during the flight. On Friday at 4:30 PM EDT, only 15 minutes after receiving FAA approval for the regulation change, JetBlue’s Flight 2302 from New York's JFK to Buffalo became the first commercial flight to allow passengers to use their PEDs gate-to-gate. Read More
In a development that would seem to bring a whole new meaning to the term Lightning charger, Nokia and the University of Southampton claim to have used simulated lightning to charge a Nokia Lumia 925 mobile phone. A University press release states that a 200,000 V was "sent" across a 30 cm gap with the light and heat generated supposedly similar to that of a lightning strike. But is there really any cause for excitement, or are we merely witnessing special effects? Read More
With companies that blazed the E Ink eReader trail such as Amazon and Kobo branching out into tablets with LCD displays, you might be forgiven for thinking that E Ink technology is on the way out. But E Ink (the company) was at IFA, determined to demonstrate that this is far from the case by showcasing new E Ink technology and applications, including tri-color displays, retail price tags, and, perhaps most interestingly, secondary displays for mobile devices. Read More
If asked what would be a great power source for mobile phones, it’s a fair bet that most people wouldn't make urine their first choice. But that's exactly what a group of scientists at Bristol Robotics Laboratory in the UK have done. As part of a project to find new ways to provide electricity for small devices in emergency situations and developing countries they have created a new fuel cell system powered by pee. Read More
Today's cellphone market is highly focused on smartphones. Android and iPhone have a stranglehold on the market, but does that mean there isn't room for something different? Micro-Phone certainly hopes so, as it is looking to bring its tiny GSM phone to market with the help of crowd-funding service Indiegogo. Instead of focusing on apps and other advanced features, Micro-Phone is focused on making a device that is small enough to carry anywhere, while still offering useful features such a locator. Read More
We live in an age where people in the developed world are so dependent on electricity that if it wasn't available a whole civilization would collapse in a week. It’s therefore ironic that 1.32 billion people around the world are still without what most people have come to see as a basic necessity. To mark its 100th anniversary, the Panasonic Corporation plans to distribute 100,000 solar lanterns that the company has developed that can not only provide light, but also charge mobile phones and other small devices. Read More
There may soon be another technical specification to consider when buying a mobile device. Researchers from the University of Bristol and the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI Saarbrücken) have coined the term “shape resolution” to indicate the self-actuated shape-shifting abilities they believe will be featured in the next generation of mobile devices. To demonstrate this new metric, the researchers have developed a number of prototype shape-shifting devices they have dubbed “Morphees,” which have the potential to change their shape on demand, depending on the desired use. Read More
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