Photokina 2014 highlights

MIT

HLAA sets to an elastic consistency, and bonds with cardiac tissue

A hole in the heart is never a good thing, so when an infant is born with such a defect, doctors have to act quickly to fix it. Unfortunately, both sutures and staples can damage the heart tissue, plus it takes too long to apply sutures. Existing surgical adhesives have their own drawbacks in that they can be toxic, and they typically become unstuck in wet, dynamic environments such as the heart. As a result, infants often require subsequent operations to "replug" the hole. Now, however, scientists have developed a sort of superglue for the heart, that quickly and securely bonds patches to holes.  Read More

WiTricity has unveiled a charging system for the iPhone 5/5s at 2014 CES

Gizmag has followed the development of the resonant wireless power transfer technology WiTricty since it was first theorized in 2007. Now it appears the technology is only one step away from being available to consumers with the developers seeing take-up by original equipment manufacturers (OEMs). The company has also displayed a wireless charging system designed for the iPhone 5 as proof of the capability and readiness of the technology for market.  Read More

Artistic rendering of a planet's transmission spectrum (Image: Christine Daniloff/MIT, Jul...

A team of MIT researchers has described a new method for finding the mass of exoplanets by studying the spectra of light passing through the planet's atmosphere. Because a planet's mass can tell us a lot about its potential for harboring life, this development could provide an important tool in solving the puzzle of whether or not we're alone in the universe.  Read More

One of two versions of MIT's prototype portable scanner

If you're like a lot of people, you don't make an annual trip to the ophthalmologist to get your eyes checked ... and you really ought to, in order to catch any problems before it's too late. If it were possible to get them checked at a regular doctor's office or clinic, though, perhaps you might do so more often. That's one of the reasons that a team at MIT have designed a new hand-held retinal scanner, that can quickly and easily be used anywhere.  Read More

Software developed at MIT subtly alters photos to make faces either more (right) or less (...

Lots of people wish that they were more attractive, but have you ever wanted to just look more ... memorable? Just a few tweaks here and there, to help keep your face from being forgotten? Well, software created by researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory can now make that happen – to photos of your face, that is.  Read More

A subject's position is tracked by a WiTrack system (screen at lower left) located in anot...

Microsoft's Kinect system is certainly impressive, but now that we've had a chance to get used to it and start taking it for granted, it does have one problem – you have to stay located in front of it. MIT's new WiTrack system, however, can track users' movements even when those people are in another room. Among other things, this could allow for video games in which the players run all over their house.  Read More

An X-ray of a human wrist demonstrates the system's ability to reveal soft-tissue structur...

X-ray machines are all large devices that can only image hard structures such as bone, unless a contrast-enhancing solution such as barium is present in the patient ... right? Well, no, not all of them. A new system developed by researchers at MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital is small enough to be considered portable, doesn't expose patients to as much radiation, and can image soft tissues in minute detail.  Read More

The Hangbag in both its forms, being used to first carry clothes and then to help store th...

The Hangbag is a paper shopping bag that transforms, via a simple set of folds, into a clothes hanger. Thus one product fulfills two distinct but interconnected uses.  Read More

MIT students (left to right) Ayush Bhandari, Refael Whyte and Achuta Kadambi pose next to ...

MIT researchers have developed a new time-of-flight (TOF) 3D "nano-camera" with the ability to work with translucent objects, motion, fog, rain, and other factors in the environment that totally confuse previous TOF cameras, such as Microsoft's second-gen Kinect. The MIT Media Lab team has added these new capabilities by introducing additional information into the illuminating light beam. The resulting camera costs less than US$500 in parts.  Read More

The Copenhagen Wheel turns any bike electric

Back in 2009, MIT's SENSEable City team unveiled its Copenhagen Wheel prototype. In a nutshell, it's a self-contained electrically-powered rear bicycle wheel that can be installed on any regular bike, instantly turning it into an e-bike. Today, it was announced that a commercial version of the Copenhagen Wheel is now available to consumers.  Read More

Looking for something? Search our 28,589 articles