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Microsoft

Games

New games, hardware and adding value: Which console "won" E3 2015?

With big press events from Sony, Microsoft and a raft of third party publishers, and with Nintendo's unique Direct broadcast approach, it's all too easy to get lost in the tidal wave of announcements that hit in the first few days of the E3. All three big console makers presented a vision of what consumers can expect from their systems in the coming year, but whose showing was the strongest, and whose left a bitter taste in the mouth? Read on as Gizmag assesses this year's E3 offerings, and provides musings on what the announcements might mean for the current and future landscape of console gaming.Read More

Games

You'll soon be able to play Xbox 360 games on the Xbox One

Microsoft has announced that the Xbox One will receive backwards compatibility with Xbox 360 games, starting later this year. Owners of both physical and digital copies of last-generation console games will be able to play them on the current hardware, and there's no work required on the part of developers, meaning we'll likely see a whole lot of titles become compatible.Read More

Games

Researchers cut the required bandwidth for graphics-intensive game streaming

The rise of cloud gaming services such as PlayStation Now may have ushered in a new era of convenience for blasting virtual aliens and monsters to smithereens, but on-demand play brings with it one huge unwanted drawback: the bandwidth required is astronomical. But researchers at Duke University and Microsoft Research think they have a solution that'll let gamers have their on-demand cake and eat it too. They have developed a tool called Kahawai (Hawaiian for stream), which splits the rendering calculations between your device and a remote server rather than offloading them all to the server.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Less zen, but more efficient: How the digital age is really affecting our brains

A comprehensive Microsoft study is offering insights into how living in the digital age is affecting our ability to sustain attention and how our brains are adapting to the constant flow of new stimuli. Although the results confirmed the suspicions that the information overflow is affecting our ability to focus on one task for long periods of time, the news isn't all bad, as it seems we're also training our brains to multitask more effectively.Read More

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