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Microscopes

The Optiscan confocal Endomicroscope is able to show cells at this high magnification leve...

June 24, 2008 In order to view cells at a high enough magnification to identify cancerous and pre-cancerous growths, doctors currently have to perform biopsy surgery - the invasive removal of cells so they can be examined in a laboratory. But a new Australian endoscope technology is about to remove the need for a biopsy altogether by offering doctors the ability to examine tissue at single-cell and sub-cellular magnification levels as the camera moves through the body. Optiscan's miniature endomicroscope offers up to 1000x magnification as opposed to the 40x magnification of traditional endoscopes, and will greatly speed up the detection and diagnosis of cancerous cells.  Read More

Detection of DNA using the nanodevice

March 28, 2008 Arizona State University researcher Wayne Frasch has designed a method of DNA detection that is faster and more portable than any other current model. The result is a biosensing nanodevice that could transform security screening and health testing.  Read More

Celestron's new LCD Digital Microscope

January 11, 200 Celestron, the people who brought us the SkyScout Scope refractor telescope has released two new microscopes, a USB-powered handheld digital microscope (HDM) and a new LCD Digital Microscope (LDM) aimed at hobbyists. The HDM allows you to view and capture still or video images at 20 to 400 times magnification power and view on your computer screen via the USB cable while the LDM has a high-resolution 3.5” (88mm) LCD screen so users can view the images and video they have captured and saved.  Read More

The ORION™ Helium ion Microscope from Carl Zeiss SMT

October 31, 2007 A revolutionary type of microscope that uses a beam of helium ions to provide significantly higher resolution images than commonly used electron microscopes promises a new era in sub-nanometer, ultra-high resolution scanning microscopy.  Read More

University of Utah biologist Dale Clayton demonstrates the the latest prototype of the Lou...

November 8, 2006 Whatever your opinion of head lice, it must be said that they are fair creatures as they do not discriminate by race, religion, gender or social status. Each year, somewhere between 6 million and 12 million Americans are infested with head lice, making children miss 12 million to 24 million school days, as lice have developed resistance to many of the currently used insecticide shampoos. Now biologists have invented a chemical-free, hairdryer-like device they have dubbed the LouseBuster which eradicates head lice infestations on children without the use of chemicals. A study published in the November 2006 issue of the journal Pediatrics "shows our invention has considerable promise for curing head lice," says Dale Clayton, the University of Utah biology professor who led the research and co-invented the machine.  Read More

X-Loupe turns your Canon IXUS into a digital microscope

August 6, 2006 We love technologies that enable new techniques, help lots of people and generally add massive value while costing very little, and you can tick all those boxes for the X-Loupe. The X-Loupe is an attachment for Canon IXUS compact cameras that transforms the camera into a 150X handheld, lightweight, digital microscopic capable of 5MPX photography. The X-Loupe weighs only 300 grams, works in still or video mode, comes with its own dimmable LED lens ring so that you can illuminate your subject perfectly, has a Japanese-made Lithium Ion battery that’s good for four hours or 150 shots and has all the preview, TV-connectivity of the IXUS. Accordingly, we can think of hundreds of applications where the X-Loupe can be used - education, medical, documenting medical conditions, industrial process, quality control, archaeology, authentication, research ad infinitum. Sold as a bundle on-line, the Canon IXUS 65 camera and X-Loupe PRO comes with three lens (60X, 100X and 150X) for US$1849 retail and the company is seeking international distributors. Extensive image library.  Read More

The Scalar DG-3 - third generation Portable Digital Microscope

March 31, 2006 A fortnight from now, Scalar Corporation will begin shipping the DG-3, the third generation of what was the world's first portable digital microscope. If you’re unaware of the capabilities available in a touch-and-view, portable microscope, we suggest you might review the following, as it seems to us that it has application in almost every production, maintenance and non-destructive testing process known to man. The strength of the DG-3 is its extreme portability, meaning it can be used in the field or factory, in a fuselage, on animals … basically anywhere. Surfaces are magnified with its LED illuminated lenses from 25x to 1000x and then imaged by its 2.3 megapixel sensor complete with calibrated measurement (micron) bars in the image. Scalar microscopes are used for sophisticated and mission-critical inspection by companies such as NASA, Boeing, the United Space Alliance, car manufacturer s, airlines and the military but as the unit has matured and become more readily available, we envision the DG-3 being used wherever it’s important to understand what’s happening on a micron level.  Read More

Proscope digital microscope

Looking like an instrument that a doctor might use to examine your inner ear, the ProScope's digital microscope is a handheld digital device that can display and capture true-colour images on your computer via a USB connection.  Read More

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