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Meteorite

Space

Meteorite discovery: "No one has seen anything like this one before"

About 470 million years ago, two asteroids smashed into each other in outer space and shattered into multitudinous pieces. Many of those pieces rained down on Earth over the course of a million years as meteorites, and have become well-known by scientists. But the other space rock involved in the cosmic head-on collision has never been known – until now, thanks to the discovery of a meteorite that's never been seen before on our planet.Read More

Science

King Tut's dagger was out of this world

Scientists have long debated the origins of the iron in a dagger blade belonging to King Tutankhamun that was discovered 91 years ago. New evidence, obtained through the use of highly-accurate X-ray technology, should end the discussion, revealing that the metal in the famous dagger made its way to Earth as part of an ancient meteorite.Read More

Space

Oldest micrometeorites ever found hold clues to Earth's ancient atmosphere

About 2.4 billion years ago on Earth, something known as the Great Oxygenation Event occurred when Earth's lower atmosphere began to become rich in O2 as oxygen sinks such as dissolved iron and organic material became saturated and couldn't hold any more. Before that, the air near the surface of our planet contained less than 0.001 percent of today's oxygen level. While we've known this for a while, scientists were never quite sure what the Earth's upper atmosphere looked like at the time. Now, by examining fossilized cosmic dust, a team of researchers has sorted it out.Read More

Space

MIT study redefines the role of meteorites in the formation of the early solar system

Until now, it has been generally accepted that a meteor constitutes a time capsule – a relic of the early creation of the solar system that has fallen to Earth, allowing us to delve into the distant past by looking at the composition of the essentially unchanged material that formed the basis of planetary formation. However, a new study carried out by researchers from MIT and Purdue University seeks to challenge the established belief, asserting that rather than representing the kernel of planetary creation, that they are instead a by-product of the violent and often cataclysmic process.Read More

Science

New evidence supports theory that life may have started on Mars

New evidence presented by Prof. Steven Benner at The Westheimer Institute for Science and Technology in Florida suggests that, billions of years ago, Mars was a much better place for the first cells to have formed compared to Earth. This gives more weight to the theory that life may have started on the Red Planet and then found its way to Earth aboard a meteorite.Read More

Space

Russian meteor blast heard around the world

When the Chelyabinsk meteor exploded high over Russia on February 15, it was a blast heard around the world. This isn't just a figure of speech. Though too low-frequency for human hearing, sound waves from the 500-kiloton detonation of the 17-meter (56-ft) rock were picked up in Antarctica – some 15,000 km (9,320 miles) away – by 17 Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO) infrasound stations dedicated to detecting nuclear explosions above or below ground.Read More

64,000 mph asteroid was fastest on record

On April 22 this year, a daytime fireball was seen throughout the western United States, accompanied by a loud booming sound heard over much of California's Sierra Nevada mountains around Lake Tahoe. Scientists have now carried out a thorough analysis of the meteorite and found that it was the fastest meteor ever recorded at 28.6 km/s (64,000 mph).Read More

A $1,100+ thumb drive, straight from outer space

Who says that USB flash drives have to be simple little plastic items designed for carrying around data? ZaNa Design certainly doesn't think so. As such, it's launched a thumb drive called the Apophis that starts at US$1,100 and is made with authentic and certified meteorite.Read More

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