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Memory

— Good Thinking

New tech allows 'memory materials' to store multiple memorized shapes

By - September 2, 2010 1 Picture
They’re known as smart materials, memory materials or shape memory alloys, but it all boils down to the same thing: materials that hold one shape, but then take on another at a certain temperature. Such substances have been around for decades, but now researchers at Canada’s University of Waterloo have taken them to a new level. Using a patent-pending process, they can embed multiple shape memories in one object – in other words, while memory materials can presently take on only two shapes, going from one to the other at just one temperature, using the new process they could take on several shapes at several temperatures. The Multiple Memory Material Technology (MMMT) is said to work with virtually any memory material. Read More
— Computers

World’s fastest 4GB DDR3, 2133MHz memory modules unveiled by OCZ Technology

By - July 21, 2010 4 Pictures
OCZ Technology has unveiled its fastest 4GB DDR3 RAM modules yet. Capable of reaching frequencies up to 2133MHz and CL 10-10-10-30 timing, OCZ’s new modules are available in 4GB, 8GB Dual Channel and 12GB Triple Channel kits and feature a liquid cooling system and aluminum fins for maximum heat dissipation. Due to the growth in High Definition and High Quality media, OCZ says it has designed the ultimate in memory technology to ensure that the bottle-neck in your system will not be the memory modules. Read More
— Computers

Anobit unites the best of two worlds for faster, cheaper SSDs

By - June 24, 2010 1 Picture
Solid state drives (SSD) have been around for some time. Unlike other data storage devices, however, their cost per GB seems reluctant to drop quickly enough to make sense economically not just to consumers, but to enterprises as well. Using a recently patented technology, the Israeli startup Anobit has announced an SSD series that makes a huge step toward making SSDs a tangibly faster and more affordable solution for the enterprise world. Read More
— Computers

Boosting software speed by up to 20 percent

By - April 6, 2010 1 Picture
For some programs, the arrival of multi-core processing power has made little difference to how they operate. Some applications, such as word processors and web browsers, are unable to split process operation over a number of cores and instead pile everything onto just one. Researchers from North Carolina's State University have come up with a way to break up such programs into different threads, resulting in a 20 percent increase in run speed. Read More
— Science

Harnessing heat for greener platter-based hard drives

By - March 1, 2010 1 Picture
Solid state drives (SSDs) should - theoretically - offer energy savings compared to the conventional platter-based variety. They have no moving parts and don’t require the battery draining spinning of platters that leads to excessive heat generation. But researchers have found that random thermal fluctuations in magnetic memory can be harnessed to reduce the energy required to store information on these drives, offering the prospect of magnetic-based computer memory that operates at significantly lower power than platter-based HDDs. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Increasing magnesium intake can boost brainpower - at least in rats

By - January 29, 2010 1 Picture
Your mother was right – eating your “greens” (which contain magnesium) is good for you. In fact, according to neuroscientists at MIT and Tsinghua University in Beijing, rats who were fed a new compound that increased their brain magnesium demonstrated enhanced learning abilities, working memory, and short- and long-term memory. The dietary supplement also boosted older rats’ ability to perform a variety of learning tests. Great, if it’s not hard enough getting rid of the rodents now, imagine trying to remove smarter rats! Read More
— Digital Cameras

Store, sort and share - the Kodak Slice Touchscreen digital camera (and pocket photo album)

By - January 8, 2010 3 Pictures
No longer just a device intended to capture images, the digital camera becomes a veritable pocket photo album with the latest offering from Kodak, the Slice Touchscreen. Featuring a 3.5” LCD touchscreen 5X optical zoom and 14MP resolution, the Slice also packs a 2GB internal memory with tagging functionality. This not only recognizes up to 20 faces allowing the user to tag photos by person, place, date or occasion, but also lets the user tag photos for easy uploading to sites like Flickr and Facebook. Read More
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