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Medication

— Medical

Drug-delivering nanoparticles pose a triple threat to cancer

By - April 16, 2014 2 Pictures
Delivering drugs that can knock out tumor cells within the body, without causing adverse side effects, is a tricky busines. It's why scientists have taken to engineering new and creative types of nanoparticles that do the job. Increasing a nanoparticle's ability to carry more drugs expands treatment options, but creating nanoparticles capable of delivering more than one or two drugs has proven difficult – until now. Scientists at MIT report creating a revolutionary building block technique that's enabled them to load a nanoparticle with three drugs. The approach, they say, could be expanded to allow a nanoparticle to carry hundreds more. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Nasal spray could provide highly-targeted treatment for depression

By - March 27, 2014 1 Picture
A nasal spray containing a specially-developed protein peptide could form the basis for highly-targeted treatment for depression, new research from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) has shown. The peptide, when delivered in spray from, was found to relieve symptoms of depression, with the lead researcher hopeful of little to no side-effects. Read More
— Medical

Implant measures medication levels in bloodstream, in real time

By - January 23, 2014 1 Picture
Figuring out how much medication a patient should be taking can be a tricky business. Although things like age and weight are used as guidelines, factors such as the individual person's metabolism can have a marked effect on how effective the drugs are. With that in mind, scientists at the University of California, Santa Barbara have developed an implantable device that provides continuous real-time readings on how much medication is currently in a person's bloodstream. Read More
— Medical

Hydrogel could dispense pain-killing medicine to joints as they move

By - January 16, 2014 2 Pictures
People suffering from joint problems such as osteoarthritis tend to take a lot of anti-inflammatory drugs, even though such medications affect their whole body, all of the time. Scientists at the University of Delaware, however, are developing what could be a more effective alternative. It's a hydrogel that can be injected into the joint, and it releases medication only in response to mechanical force – in other words, whenever the joint is used. Read More
— Science

Plant-based magnetic microswimmers to deliver drugs more precisely

By - December 23, 2013 2 Pictures
If you remember the 1966 science fiction film Fantastic Voyage, you'll recall how miniaturized government agents traveled through blood vessels in a tiny submarine, in their attempt remove a blood clot from a scientist's brain. Synthetic nanomotors that can do the same job have been the subject of numerous research efforts and now University of California, San Diego (UCSD) researchers report that they've created powerful biodegradable "microswimmers" that can deliver drugs more precisely, derived from common plants like passion fruit and wild banana. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Ultrasound pulses could replace daily injections for diabetics

By - November 21, 2013 1 Picture
There could be hope for diabetics who are tired of giving themselves insulin injections on a daily basis. Researchers at North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill are developing a system in which a single injection of nanoparticles could deliver insulin internally for days at a time – with a little help from pulses of ultrasound. Read More
— Science

Edible electronic medical devices could be swallowed like regular pills

By - April 25, 2013 1 Picture
Over the past several years, scientists have developed so-called “camera pills,” that can be swallowed by patients and then transmit video from within their bodies. While such non-digestible gadgets could serve as an invaluable means of imaging, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University are now looking into tiny electronic medical devices that could be swallowed and partially digested, providing non-invasive treatment in the process. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Med Vault aims to eliminate painkiller abuse

By - April 19, 2013 6 Pictures
It’s an unfortunate fact that prescription painkiller abuse is on the rise. In some cases people are taking the drugs to get high, while in others, patients simply want more relief than their prescription allows. In either scenario, the results are often fatal. That’s why a group of engineering students from Brigham Young University have created a lockable medication-dispensing device known as the Med Vault. Read More

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