Advertisement
more top stories »

Mathematics


— Science

Quantum entanglement isn't only spooky, you can't avoid it

By - June 10, 2013 3 Pictures
Quantum entanglement is the key to quantum computing, cryptography, and numerous other real-world applications of quantum mechanics. It is also one of the strangest phenomena in the Universe, overcoming barriers of space and time and knitting the entire cosmos into an integrated whole. Scientists have long thought that entanglement between two particles was a rare and fleeting phenomenon, so delicate that exposure of the particles to their surroundings would quickly destroy this linkage. Now mathematicians at Case Western University have shown that entanglement between parts of large systems is the norm, rather than being a rare and short-lived relationship. Read More

Mathematical model predicts Hollywood blockbusters

With Hollywood movie studios increasingly gambling astronomical sums of money on the next big thing, they might want to pay attention to the work being done by Akira Ishii at Tottori University. His research group claims to have developed a mathematical equation that combines advertising, word-of-mouth, and social networks to predict if a movie will be successful. Read More
— Around The Home

Fibonacci Cabinet brings order to the world of home furnishings

By - October 23, 2012 5 Pictures
A traditional Chinese medicine cabinet features numerous deep drawers, all of the same dimensions. It's a piece of furniture that has remained unchanged for centuries thanks to the form being perfectly suited to its function. By applying some mathematical magic to the core design of the Chinese medicine cabinet, design studio Utopia has created Fibonacci Cabinet. Read More
— Science

A new dimension for mathematics – the Periodic Table of shapes

By - February 16, 2011 1 Picture
Mathematicians are creating their own version of the periodic table that will provide a vast directory of all the possible shapes in the universe across three, four and five dimensions, linking shapes together in the same way as the periodic table links groups of chemical elements. The three-year project, announced today, should provide a resource that mathematicians, physicists and other scientists can use for calculations and research in a range of areas, including computer vision, number theory, and theoretical physics. For some mental exercise, check out these animations that have already been analyzed in the project. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

A jolt of electricity could boost your math skills

By - November 5, 2010 1 Picture
If you’re one of the many people, yours truly included, who always found math class a bit on the difficult side then maybe all you needed was a jolt of electricity. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has been used as a psychiatric treatment since the 1930s and is still used today, most commonly as a treatment for severe depression. Now researchers are reporting that applying an electrical current to the brain could enhance a person’s mathematical performance for up to six months without impacting their other cognitive functions. Read More
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement