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Street View, regular and satellite View - Google Maps Navigation does them all

Every platform needs a killer app and for the Android OS the early contender for that title has to be the just announced Google Maps Navigation for mobile. Only available for Android 2.0 phones, the new application takes the current Google Maps for mobile and gives it a hefty shot of steroids. Most of the new features that set the app apart from most in-car turn-by-turn navigation systems come courtesy of its Internet connectivity, which makes it possible to access a wealth of relevant information residing on Google’s servers while out and about.  Read More

The 24 series personal navigation systems from Navigon guide the user in the car and on fo...

For the intrepid urban explorers out there, Navigon has unveiled a new 24 series of personal navigation systems featuring a “Last Mile” function that continues guiding the user on foot – as well as remembering where the car is parked.  Read More

The Vexia Econav 435 gives drivers recommendations on the most fuel-efficient way to reach...

As GPS navigation systems increase in popularity, the world’s fuel supplies simultaneously are in decline. However, the Vexia Econav 435 GPS is attempting to do its bit for the environment by offering a system that gives drivers information on the most economical route, which gear to use and when - even how firmly to accelerate. The manufacturers say the aim of the unit is to reduce drivers' fuel consumption by up to one third.  Read More

North American NAVIGON on board navigation system for the iPhone

The convergence of the mobile phone and GPS took a quantum leap this week when NAVIGON released a North American version of its on-board navigation software for the iPhone. MobileNavigator transforms any iPhone 3G (or S) with OS 3.0 into a complete navigation device. The on-board approach means the software and map data is on the iPhone, so there are no subscription fees to pay or map downloads to wait for during navigation. It includes most regular NAVIGON functionality such as Reality View Pro, Lane Assistant Pro, Speed Assistant and Day & Night Mode, branded POIs along the route with more features to be added with software updates later this year.  Read More

The thermal effects of the 'Little Boy' nuclear bomb if it was dropped on New York City.

Not that it's particularly likely, but as long as nuclear bombs exist, there's the chance - however slim - that one might go off somewhere near you. This little Google Maps overlay might be a bit morbid, but it's also pretty fascinating. It shows you the heat, pressure and fallout spread of a range of different nuclear bombs detonating anywhere in the world. It's particularly sobering to get a sense of the scale of the devastation caused by the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs in World War 2 - and then see how tiny those bombs are compared to the USSR's enormous Tsar Bomba, the biggest nuke ever detonated.  Read More

Pioneer AVIC-X in-car navigation

Concentrating on improved functionality, visual clarity and ease-of-use for the driver, Pioneer Electronics' latest update to its AVIC range of navigation systems offer a variety of screen views, pop-up highway signs for major junctions, on-screen info designed for ‘at-a-glance’ reading and more than 1300 3-D icons of major landmarks.  Read More

The Garmin Oregon 550 with built in 3.2 mega pixel camera

Garmin's latest handheld GPS offering for explorers who like to hit the open road - as well as veer completely off it on foot - crams a 3-axis compass, 850MB of on-board memory and a 3.2 megapixel, 4X optical zoom digital camera into a 6.8 oz., water and weatherproof package with a 3-inch touchscreen interface.  Read More

Garmin nüvi 465T truck GPS navigator

Truckers have special requirements for on-road navigation that most of us wouldn't even consider and GPS units that cater for these needs make a good deal of sense. Garmin has now entered this niche with the announcement of the nüvi® 465T, the company's first portable navigation device designed exclusively for over the road long-haul navigation and delivery trucks.  Read More

Ultramafic rocks (in red) that potentially could absorb CO2 (Image: U.S. Geological Survey...

The debate about the benefits of using Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) to fight against climate change is ongoing. One one hand there are reservations regarding suitable sequestration sites that provide sufficient security to store CO2 for centuries as well as the cost of implementing such a system, which could draw important funds away from the development of renewable energy technologies. On the other, we are still heavily reliant on burning fossil fuels to produce energy and this infrastructure can't be replaced overnight. CCS is obviously attractive to existing power generation companies as it allows them to keep hold of their existing infrastructure and for this reason, it is more than likely that CSS schemes will continue to gather momentum. So where to we can CO2 be stored? Scientists at Columbia University’s Earth Institute and the U.S. Geological Survey have produced a new report that maps large rock formations in the United States that can also absorb CO2 and are exploring ways to speed up the CCS process.  Read More

Nokia Maps plans mobile assault on Google Maps

December 3, 2008 Dave Weinstein reports Nokia has announced a major update to its Nokia Maps application for S60 smart phones, which not only updates their mobile mapping, but adds desktop support for trip planning and coordination through their new Maps on Ovi service.  Read More

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