Highlights from the 2014 LA Auto Show

Lock

The Stemlock makes your handlebars temporarily useless

Whether it's bicycles, cars or houses, if thieves really want to get past the lock on something, they can. The trick is to simply not make it worth their while to do so, by adding extra hassles. The Stemlock is just such a hassle. It internally disconnects a bike's handlebar stem from its fork, making it impossible for a thief to steer.  Read More

The distance at which the fob will work is adjustable, meaning it can be set to unlock the...

For some office workers the task of locking and unlocking their computer is a regular part of the job, while for others it's frequency is dictated by the extent of their caffeine addiction. Looking to automate this process is the team behind the GateKeeper Chain, a key fob with a built-in proximity sensor which automatically locks your PC when you walk away and then unlocks it when you return to your desk.  Read More

Loop provides secure parking for two bikes, both of which are safe from scratches thanks t...

With bicycle theft such a common crime, anyone who regularly cycles in the city needs to both own a good bike lock and choose wisely when it comes to parking. We've seen lots of innovative approaches to both bike locks – such as the Saddle Lock and Foldylock – and bike racks, such as the Cyclepod and the Next Gen. Loop, from Ottawa-based design consultancy The Federal Inc., is another attempt at improving on the latter.  Read More

The DoorJammer helps keep doors from being forced open

If you're staying in a hotel that's kind of ... sketchy, then you might not be satisfied with simply locking your door when you're in for the night. You could wedge a doorstop of your own under it, but now there's a portable gadget that is claimed to work better – the DoorJammer.  Read More

The Next Gen Bike Rack is claimed to secure all components of a bicycle, using a single U-...

Have you ever noticed how sometimes even if there are slots available in a bike parking rack, some people will instead choose to lock their bike to a parking meter or sign post? This is because those racks aren't really conducive to securing the frame and both wheels, using a single U-lock. Montreal inventor Peter Krantz, however, has designed a rack that is.  Read More

The Lock8, in place and in use

With a regular bicycle lock, you secure it to your bike when you park, then just hope that everything will still be intact when you get back. Such is not the case with the bike-mounted Lock8, however. If anyone tries monkeying with it, a high-pitched alarm will sound, and you will be instantly notified on your smartphone. Should the thief proceed to steal the bike, you can use your phone to track its whereabouts.  Read More

The BitLock is a smartphone-activated bike lock

Consumers now have their choice of several smartphone-controlled door locks, which allow users to grant access to select people, and that automatically cause the door to unlock when a user approaches. San Francisco-based startup Mesh Motion has taken those same ideas, and applied them to a bicycle security device known as the BitLock.  Read More

Foldylock in use on the city streets

If you bike around the city, you know how important a good lock can be. That said, locks can often be a hassle to carry while riding. The Foldylock is designed to address this problem. It folds down small enough to be mounted on the bike frame or tossed into a bag.  Read More

The Sphyke C3N setup for quick-release wheels

There are already plenty of options when it comes to keeping people from stealing your whole bike, but what if you also want to guard against people stealing bits of it? Well, you could buy components that can only be removed with their own special tool, or replace all of your mounting bolts with ones that require a key to take off. Sphyke is now offering a third alternative – its C3N system replaces a bike's existing nuts and bolts with ones that incorporate a tiny combination lock.  Read More

The Recordura electronic door lock runs purely on electricity generated by users pushing o...

Smartphone-enabled electronic door locks such as the Unikey, Lockitron and Goji do have advantages over their traditional counterparts – digital “keys” can be sent to multiple users’ phones, access to locked rooms can be limited to specific dates and/or times for certain users, and keys stored on lost phones can simply be deactivated. However, as with just about any electronic version of a purely-mechanical device, they do introduce one complicating factor: they require a power supply. The Recordura lock, however, generates its own electricity when users push on its handle.  Read More

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