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Lighting


— Physics

World's first white laser demonstrated

Incandescent bulbs, LEDs, and CFLs may soon have to budge up because a new lighting technology is in town – white lasers. Using nanotechnology to create a bespoke semiconducting material, a team of scientists at Arizona State University has developed a laser that can produce white light that is brighter and more efficient than LEDs.

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— Good Thinking

SALt lamp runs on a glass of water and two teaspoons of salt

Many of the more than 7,000 islands in the Philippines lack access to electricity, so after the sun goes down light usually comes by way of kerosene lamps. While cheap, these fire hazards are bad for the environment and human health. This, combined with the cost of keeping them burning has given one startup the impetus to build a better solution. The SALt (Sustainable Alternative Lighting) lamp burns for eight hours at a time running on only a glass of water and two teaspoons of salt.

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— Around The Home Review

Review: We flip the switch on MiPow's Playbulb Bluetooth LED bulbs

The number of LED bulbs on the market has exploded in recent years, and with them has come a dizzying array of so-called smart bulbs featuring wireless connectivity and control, allowing users to set options for colors, schedules, and remote on/off functions. Although most of these look and perform similarly, consumer experience still varies as it generally comes down to the execution of the companion app. So how do the devices in MiPow’s Playbulb Studio compare? We lit up these LED bulbs to see how well they shine.

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— Materials

Graphene used to create world's thinnest light bulb

Over 130 years ago, Thomas Edison used carbon as the conducting filament in the very first commercial light-bulb. Now a team of scientists and engineers have used that very same element, in its perfectly crystalline form of graphene, to create what they claim to be the world's thinnest light-bulb. Even though just one atom thick and covering an area almost too small to see unaided, the new device is so bright that the light it produces can easily be seen with the naked eye. Read More
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