Shopping? Check out our latest product comparisons

Lightbulbs

The King Edison Pendant Lamp consists of a tiny working chandelier encased in a light bulb...

Chandeliers can be pretty classy if they’re done right, but they can also take up a lot of space and gather a lot of dust. What someone should do is make a tiny chandelier, and encase it in a light bulb-like globe. Well, wouldn’t ya know it, that’s just what UK designers Brendan Young and Vanessa Battaglia did – and you can buy one, if you’ve got the cash.  Read More

18 year-old engineering student Chris Rieger has spent the last 6 months building his LevL...

The inclusion of a floating lamp, bed or just about any appropriately-sized household object in a room is almost certain to be received with open-mouthed wonder and demand closer inspection from the curious minds of young and old alike. Add the wireless transfer of power into the mix and you're guaranteed to have a winner. Such is the case with 18 year-old Chris Rieger's LevLight. It's not exactly huge, doesn't break any new ground in a technical sense and is more functional than flashy. Nevertheless, the floating LED is quite the visual feast.  Read More

GE has announced the addition of a 100 W incandescent equivalent to its range of LED repla...

GE Lighting has announced that it is getting in on the 100 W-equivalent LED replacement act. The 27 W Energy Smart LED bulb joins its range of incandescent bulb replacements that already includes 40 W and 60 W equivalents. And like an incandescent bulb, GE claims its LED bulb emits light evenly in all directions. But how does the 100 W equivalent stack up performance-wise?  Read More

Nokero's N100 weatherproof solar lightbulb could provide a clean, safe and affordable ligh...

As public consultation starts on ways to reduce and replace fuel-burning lighting around the globe, Nokero has announced a solar-powered LED solution aimed squarely at disaster areas and the developing world. The rugged, rainproof N100 is about the same size as a standard lightbulb but requires no electricity and offers users around two hours of bright light in exchange for a day's worth of sun.  Read More

Toshiba LED light bulbs at CES 2010

Toshiba, was waving the green flag at CES this week in announcing that its E-CORE LED lightbulbs will soon be available in the US market. An E-CORE bulb has a life expectancy of 40,000 hours, which is 40 times longer than traditional incandescant lightbulbs and at the same time it reduces CO2 emissions by 85 percent in comparison.  Read More

The Oyule turn the incandescent bulb into the very thing it replaced

Everything (well, one thing anyway) old is new again, and vice versa with an oil lamp made from a reclaimed incandescent light globe. The work of industrial designer Sergio Silva, the Oyule lamps are his attempt to “send the bulbs back in time”, at a period when the incandescent bulb is itself being replaced by newer lighting technology.  Read More

The Eternaleds HydraLux-4 liquid-cooled LED bulb

Liquid-cooled PCs are a mainstay for PC enthusiasts looking to eek every last bit of performance from their beloved machines and now it seems this approach has reached the world of the LED light bulb. A company called Eternaleds has introduced the HydraLux-4 LED Bulb, the world’s first LED light bulb to use "liquid-cooling technology" to give a true 360-degree light like a regular incandescent light bulb.  Read More

High efficiency flat light source could be the end for the light bulb

April 20, 2006 The end of the lightbulb is nigh! Scientists studying organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) have made a critical leap from single-color displays to a highly efficient and long-lived natural light source. The invention is the latest fruit of a 13-year OLED research program led by Mark Thompson, professor of chemistry at USC and Stephen Forrest of the University of Michigan. If the device can be mass-manufactured cheaply - a realistic expectation, according to Thompson - interior lighting could look vastly different in the future. Almost any surface in a home, whether flat or curved, could become a light source: walls, curtains, ceilings, cabinets or tables. Since OLEDs are transparent when turned off, the devices could even be installed as windows or skylights to mimic the feel of natural light after dark - or to serve as the ultimate inconspicuous flat-panel television. This is potentially a disruptive technology and could significantly change the way we interact with our homes.  Read More

Looking for something? Search our 27,803 articles