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Light field

VR

Lytro brings Light Field tech to virtual reality

When camera maker Lytro launched in 2011, it offered snappers something a little different – the ability to shift focus after a photo has been taken. If you wanted light field video, however, you were out of luck. The company has now rectified that with the Immerge system, a four component platform that's billed as the industry's first end-to end hardware, software and related services solution for the production of professional-grade cinematic VR content.Read More

VR

Stanford research points to Lytro-like VR that kills motion sickness

Not too long ago, virtual reality was more science fiction than science fact. Over the past couple of years, giant leaps have been made toward developing this robust platform. However, one challenge still stands in the way for greater consumer adoption: motion sickness. But this may change quickly, as a team at Stanford University has developed a more realistic way of presenting virtual reality.Read More

Digital Cameras

Lytro reveals the professional-grade Illum light field camera

When Lytro announced plans for consumer-oriented light field cameras, we were instantly smitten by the idea of being able to re-focus images after taking them. However, the quirky kaleidoscope-like form factor and low resolution of its first camera meant it was only ever going to be a hit with the most ardent early-adopter. Now the firm is back with a second-generation light field camera, the Illum, and things have got a lot more serious. Read More

Science

Fabricated nanoantennas used to produce high-resolution holograms

Holography is one of the more dramatic forms of photography, in which a three-dimensional image is stored on a photographic plate in the form of interference fringes. Researchers at Purdue University in Indiana have developed a different approach, in which a 3D image is stored in a structure of thousands of V-shaped nanoantennas etched into an ultrathin gold foil. The new approach dramatically shrinks the size of a hologram, potentially enabling photonic and plasmonic devices and optical switches small enough to be integrated into computer chips.Read More

Electronics

New technology from MIT may enable cheap, color, holographic video displays

Researchers at MIT’s Media Lab have developed a new form of holographic projector that may enable the introduction of practical color 3D holographic video displays as well as higher-resolution 2D displays with lower power consumption. The new projector is built using principles of guided wave optics to construct the spatial light modulator (SLM) that is the heart of digital holography. The MIT holographic projector, which contains an SLM costing US$10 to fabricate, provides 3D images at 30 frames per second (fps) with a resolution similar to that of a standard-definition TV. Read More

Digital Cameras

Reflectance paper displays photographs in a new light

Recently the public has become aware of the potential of light field photography through the introduction of the Lytro camera. Light field recording allows an enormous degree of post-processing, letting you create just the image you want to print and display. A print, however, expresses only one aspect, no matter how carefully chosen, of the recorded light field. Can light field information be somehow encoded into a print, so an object can be examined from this side and that, or with different lighting conditions? A team of researchers at the University of California at Santa Cruz, Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, and 3M have made the first steps toward a positive answer by developing reflectance paper. Read More

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