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Light Bulb


— Environment Feature

A tale of two tests: why Energy Star LED light bulbs are a rare breed

Just over a week ago we reported that Philips' 22 W LED light bulb, designed as a like-for-like replacement of a 100-W incandescent light bulb, was the first LED bulb of its type to receive the stamp of approval from Energy Star. But looking at the Energy Star requirements reported by Philips in its press release, it seemed a little strange that Philips' product is the only one to have been certified – given that products long on the market appear, at face value, to meet those requirements. Since then, Gizmag has spoken to LED light bulb makers Switch Lighting and other industry players to find out why they're apparently playing catch-up. Read More
— Environment

Philips 22-W LED is first Energy Star 100-W equivalent bulb ... but why?

By - April 3, 2013 1 Picture
Philips has announced that its 22-watt LED lightbulb is the first 100-watt tungsten equivalent bulb to have been awarded Energy Star certification. Often referred to as the A21, which is actually just one of several standard forms for light bulbs that this bulb happens to conform to, Philips' 22-W bulb puts out "nearly" 1,800 lumens for an efficacy of about 82 lumens/watt (lm/W). It's a fine spec, but not too dissimilar to the competition, which raises the question of why Philips' product has been singled out. Read More
— Around The Home

NanoLight claims to be world's most efficient light bulb

By - January 13, 2013 14 Pictures
Until recently LED light bulb manufacturers have struggled to find a solution in the 75 to 100-watt range which successfully replaces the soon-to-be redundant, energy crunching 100 W incandescent bulb in terms of size and brightness. Three friends from the University of Toronto are the latest to offer a feasible product to match the classic 100 W bulb without compromising on electricity consumption with their proposed NanoLight LED light bulbs. Read More
— Around The Home

The Lumen Smart Bulb bets on light entertainment

By - November 20, 2012 5 Pictures
Combining the power of smartphones, LED light bulbs, wireless and remote control technology has inspired designers to come up with smart solutions such as LIFX, Philips’ hue light bulbs and INSTEON. The Lumen Smart Bulb project, currently raising funds via indiegogo, aims to add one more option to the wireless-enabled LED market, while betting on home entertainment and well-being to score extra points. Read More
— Environment

Osram Sylvania's 100 W-equivalent LED bulb may be pick of the bunch

By - May 11, 2012 1 Picture
Following Gizmag's coverage of GE Lighting's 27 W Energy Smart and Switch Lighting's 100 W-replacement LED light bulbs, Osram Sylvania has been in touch to tell us about its 100 W-replacement LED light bulb, joining its Sylvania Ultra series: a 20 W, 1600 lumen light bulb with a warm, "incandescenty" color appearance of 2700 K. With Philips also to release a 100-W equivalent this means the big three manufacturers of light sources are joining Switch Lighting in offering high-output LED light bulbs for the home, but all things considered, Osram Sylvania's may prove the pick of the bunch. Read More
— Home Entertainment

Sound of Light - a bright approach to wireless speakers

By - May 25, 2011 6 Pictures
Combining lighting with audio by using a light socket to power a wireless speaker is a two-in-one approach that appears to be gaining traction and this latest example - the Sound of Light speaker - grabbed our attention on both the functionality and aesthetic fronts. The Sound of Light system uses a Texas Instruments 2.4 GHz Purepath Digital Signal Transmitter to set up a wireless link between an audio device such as an MP3 player, smartphone or tablet and up to four speakers within a 300 ft range. Read More
— Environment

LED bulbs not as eco-friendly as some might think

By - February 14, 2011 1 Picture
LED light bulbs are becoming increasingly popular with designers and consumers of green technology, as they use less electricity, last longer, and emit more light on a pound-for-pound basis than traditional incandescent bulbs. However, while it may be tempting to look at them as having solved the problem of environmentally-unfriendly lighting, researchers from the University of California would advise against such thinking. Read More
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