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Lenses


— Science

New process could revolutionize electron microscopy

Researchers at the University of Sheffield have created what sounds impossible - even nonsensical: an experimental electron microscope without lenses that not only works, but is orders of magnitude more powerful than current models. By means of a new form of mathematical analysis, scientists can take the meaningless patterns of dots and circles created by the lens-less microscope and create images that are of high resolution and contrast and, potentially, up to 100 times greater magnification. Read More
— Outdoors

Dual Eyewear sunglasses provide bifocal lenses for reading bike computers

Attempting to read your watch or bike computer through sweat-fogged glasses while simultaneously keeping half a pupil on the road ahead can be difficult and dangerous. And those expensive electronics don't do you much good if you can't read them. That's why Dual Eyewear has created sunglasses equipped with magnifying lenses that make reading those small, grainy LCD screens a little easier. Read More
— Digital Cameras

Pentax Ricoh and Marc Newson create new K-01 camera with world's thinnest interchangeable lens

Pentax Ricoh and acclaimed designer Marc Newson have joined forces to create a new 16 megapixel mirrorless camera and a new pancake lens that's claimed to be the world's thinnest interchangeable lens. The Pentax K-01 interchangeable lens camera (pronounced "kay zero one") is also said to be compatible with over 25 million previously-produced Pentax K-mount lenses. Read More
— Sports

Anon ski goggles use magnetic lenses for easy swapping

The problem with the interchangeable lens systems commonly used in ski goggles is that they're tedious to work with. You have to slowly tear the frame from the original lens, line the grooves of the replacement lens up just right and then snap it back together section by section. Not only is this the type of thing you might need to get a table in the cafeteria for, it's the type of thing that could haunt you all day if you inadvertently put the lens in cockeyed. The Anon M1 goggles make switchable lenses easier and more seamless than they've ever been. Magna-Tech is a simple design upgrade that lets you remove your original lenses and snap the new ones in place within seconds. Read More
— Science

Scientist closes in on creating a superlens

Some day, you may have a microscope on your smartphone camera that's as powerful as a scanning electron microscope. If you do, it will likely be thanks to research presently being conducted by Durdu Guney, an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at Michigan Technological University. He is working on creating a metamaterial-based "superlens" - a long sought-after optically-perfect lens, that could use visible light to image objects as small as 100 nanometers across. Read More
— Mobile Technology

iPhone Lens Dial turns your smartphone into a turret-lensed throwback

Once upon a time, before zoom lenses were invented, movie and TV cameras had three lenses that the user could choose between, using a Lazy Susan-type arrangement to swivel them into place - you wanted to go wide, you'd swing in the wide-angle lens, if you needed a close-up, you'd swing in the telephoto. Well, in the spirit of everything old being new again, the iPhone Lens Dial now offers the same functionality for Apple's iconic smartphone. Read More
— Digital Cameras

Big Lens app blurs out backgrounds in iPhone photos

Even though much ado has been made about the high quality of the iPhone 4’s camera, when it comes down to it, it’s still a point-and-shoot. As such, photos taken with it tend to have a fairly deep depth-of-field – that’s nice for getting as many things in focus as possible, but not great for getting those fuzzy-background professional-looking portraits and artsy shots. One solution is to use something like the iPhone SLR Mount, which lets you use SLR lenses on your smartphone’s camera. A much less costly alternative, however, is to use Reallusion’s Big Lens app. Read More
— Digital Cameras

Low-cost lens offers lo-fi creativity for Micro Four Thirds cameras

Strange though it may seem, despite manufacturers going to great lengths to provide the very best in image quality, there are quite a number of snappers who long for the kind of warm and fuzzy (and often accidental) creations from the good old days of 35mm film cameras. Olympus or Panasonic Micro Four Thirds camera owners looking for a cheaper alternative to the kind of soft edging and background blur effects offered by the likes of Lens Baby might well be interested in SLR Magic's 35mm f1.4 toy Micro Four Thirds camera lens. Read More
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