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Lenses


— Science

Scientists grow liquid crystal "flowers" to use as lenses

Scientists at the University of Pennsylvania have grown liquid crystal flowers, making it possible to create lenses as complex as the compound eye of a dragonfly. When perfected, the technology could allow the growth of lenses on curved surfaces, and structures to be assembled out of liquid crystals to build new materials, smart surfaces, microlens arrays and advanced sensors. Read More
— Digital Cameras Feature

What lens do I need? A guide to buying your next camera lens

Despite buying cameras which have been specifically designed to take and make use of different lenses, a large number of photographers only ever use the kit lens that their DSLR or interchangeable lens camera came with. It's really not that surprising, as picking the right next lens can be a daunting task. That's why we're going to try to help, with our guide to life after the kit lens. Read More
— Digital Cameras

Tiny round wide-angle lens outperforms its bigger brothers

When it comes to capturing visual information in photographs, you typically have two choices – use a wide-angle lens to capture as many parts of a scene as possible, or use a close-up lens to better capture the details of one of those parts. However, with a new camera system developed by engineers at the University of California, San Diego, you can do both at once. What's more, the lens used in this system is just one-tenth the volume of a conventional wide-angle lens. Read More
— Science

Shape-changing lens blends human and insect vision

One example of biomimicry that keeps popping up on the pages of Gizmag is the use of insect eyes as a model for innovative new optical devices. It seems that the potential for development in this area is far from exhausted with the announcement of another bug-inspired lens breakthrough from Ohio State University. This experimental lens developed by associate professor of biomedical engineering and ophthalmology, Yi Zhao, combines the wide angle properties of insect vision with the depth-of-field capabilities of a human eye. Read More
— Digital Cameras

Sony officially announces QX lens-style cameras

As any regular Gizmag reader will know, there’s currently quite an assortment of add-on lenses available for smartphone cameras. The problem is, no matter how good those lenses may be, the light ultimately ends up having to squeeze through the phone’s own tiny lens, to be processed by the phone’s tiny sensor. Sony is taking a fresh approach, however, with its much-rumored but just-officially-announced Cyber-shot QX series of lens-style cameras. Read More
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