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Lenses

— Electronics

BAE Systems develops a flat lens that acts like it's curved

By - April 21, 2014 2 Pictures
Anyone who’s ever needed a pair of thick eyeglasses has a firm idea that lenses are the one thing where form follows function. However, BAE Systems and Queen Mary’s School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science in London have put paid to that idea with a flat lens that works like a conventional curved lens, yet without any reduction in bandwidth performance. Using a combination of composite metamaterials and transformational optics for the first time, they have created a lens that's able to bend electromagnetic waves, yet isn't bound by its shape for its function. Read More
— Science

Scientists grow liquid crystal "flowers" to use as lenses

By - December 24, 2013 6 Pictures
Scientists at the University of Pennsylvania have grown liquid crystal flowers, making it possible to create lenses as complex as the compound eye of a dragonfly. When perfected, the technology could allow the growth of lenses on curved surfaces, and structures to be assembled out of liquid crystals to build new materials, smart surfaces, microlens arrays and advanced sensors. Read More
— Digital Cameras Feature

What lens do I need? A guide to buying your next camera lens

Despite buying cameras which have been specifically designed to take and make use of different lenses, a large number of photographers only ever use the kit lens that their DSLR or interchangeable lens camera came with. It's really not that surprising, as picking the right next lens can be a daunting task. That's why we're going to try to help, with our guide to life after the kit lens. Read More
— Digital Cameras

Tiny round wide-angle lens outperforms its bigger brothers

By - September 26, 2013 3 Pictures
When it comes to capturing visual information in photographs, you typically have two choices – use a wide-angle lens to capture as many parts of a scene as possible, or use a close-up lens to better capture the details of one of those parts. However, with a new camera system developed by engineers at the University of California, San Diego, you can do both at once. What's more, the lens used in this system is just one-tenth the volume of a conventional wide-angle lens. Read More
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