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LED

Electronics

LED printer creates fleeting messages that fade away

Israeli artist Liat Segal has created a device that uses light to print fading messages onto photosensitive paper. The Confession Machine uses ultraviolet (UV) LEDs that are programmed to switch on and off at certain intervals in order to print people's confessions onto paper coated with a UV sensitive pigment. Then they disappear.Read More

LED-equipped cork turns wine bottles into lamps

There's an old camping trick, for people who don't want to bother getting a lantern: just stick a flashlight up against the bottom of a plastic pop bottle, turn the flashlight on, then bask in the bottle's glow. Now you can do the same sort of thing with wine bottles, using suckUK's bottlelight. Read More

LightSpur enlightens your heels

Anyone who runs or cycles after the sun goes down will tell ya, it's vitally important to make sure that you're visible to motorists. Nathan's LightSpur is one of the latest products designed to provide you with that visibility, and it looks like it draws equal inspiration from Tron and A Fistful of Dollars.Read More

Around The Home

Smartcharge lightbulb keeps the lights on when the power goes out

When the lights go out due to a power outage at night, you'll probably have to spend the next few minutes fumbling around in the dark hoping to lay your hands on a nearby torch or trying to remember where you put the candles and matches. If only the lights could stay on for a while after the power was cut. The SmartCharge LED bulb has been developed with the simple aim of ensuring that users are never left in the dark again. It includes technology that's able to determine whether someone has just turned off the light at the switch, or there's been an actual power failure. If the latter, the bulb will provide users with hours of continuous light.Read More

Bicycles

Zackees cycling gloves feature built-in turn indicators

Head- and tail-lights certainly do a lot to help cyclists be seen at night, although they generally don't let motorists know which way those riders are planning on turning. That's where good ol' hand signals come in. In order to make those signals more visible, former Google software engineer Zach Vorhies has created Zackees illuminated turn signal gloves. Read More

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