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LED


— Around The Home

Cree aims to make fluorescent tubes obsolete with LED T8 series

Fluorescent lights aren't on the top of many people’s favorites list. Ever since they were introduced at the New York World’s Fair in 1939, they've been notorious for their cold, bluish light that is the definition of “uncomplimentary” and accompanied by flickering and a telltale buzz. Cree, Inc. is aiming to relegate fluorescent tubes to the pages of history with its new T8 series of LED tubes that promise LED-level energy savings and greatly improved light quality. Read More
— Mobile Technology

Lunecase harvests electromagnetic energy from iPhone to power LED alerts

Smartphone cases are so common that you can pick one up at the supermarket checkout stand, so for one to stand out, it needs something more than a print of a cartoon kitten. Built by Concepter, a company based in Kiev, Ukraine, the Lunecase is s a batteryless, wireless phone case that not only interacts with an iPhone, but also powers itself from the electromagnetic radiation emitted by the device. Read More
— Music

Seat and drum become one with Drumstooled

France's Patrice Bardin has come up with a stylish and eye-catching twist on self-accompaniment. Rather than stomp out a backbeat on a kick drum, home-made rhythm board or even an empty suitcase out front while thumping the strings of a battered acoustic guitar and throwing out soulful vocals, the Drumstooled is a mash up of a stool and an acoustic kick drum, with some colorful LED lighting thrown in for good measure. Read More

Scientists create world's thinnest LEDs

In regular microchips, work is performed via the movement of electrons within the chip. Thanks to the recent creation of the thinnest-ever LEDs, however, such chips may one day be able to use light instead of electrons, saving power and reducing heat. Of course, those LEDs could also just be used as a really flat form of lighting, in any number of applications. Read More
— Electronics

Gallium nitride transistors promise brighter future for LEDs

Although known for long life and low energy consumption, the LED uses a DC power supply, or driver, to overcome its sensitivity to current fluctuations, and it’s the high-frequency, high-speed switching transistors in this driver that’s made the LED so costly for use in large-scale commercial applications dominated by fluorescent and incandescent lighting. But that’s about to change. Fraunhofer researchers are developing a new, more economical means of making the high-performance gallium nitride transistors needed for the LED’s high-efficiency driver. Read More
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