Advertisement

LCD

Home Entertainment

Put down your glasses – Toshiba to release glasses-less 3D TVs this year

The sales of 3D TVs haven’t exactly set the world on fire despite the considerable marketing push by manufacturers. The scarcity of 3D content is one of the major reasons as is the fact that many consumers balk at the thought of wearing (and buying) the glasses required to produce the 3D effect. Various companies are working away on glasses-free 3D but Toshiba is the first to release a 3D TV that works without having to don dedicated eyewear – however there are a few limitations.Read More

Electronics

Researchers demonstrate advanced display technology

Only a small percentage of backlight actually makes its way out through the multiple layers that make up the ubiquitous LCD displays we use today. That may change with the development of new filter technology at the University of Michigan. White light is sent through tiny, precisely spaced gaps on nano-thin sheets of aluminum and is said to result in brighter, higher definition color reproduction. Other benefits of the technology include efficiency gains and simpler manufacturing.Read More

Home Entertainment

Sony bolsters 3D BRAVIA lineup with new NX810 series HDTVs

Sony has added to its range of 3D BRAVIA HDTVs with the announcement of the availability of three new NX810 LCD models. In screen sizes of 46-, 55- and 60-inches the sets all feature Full HD (1080p) resolution and 3D capability. DynamicEdge LED Backlighting with local dimming is employed for improved contrast while Sony’s Motionflow PRO 240Hz Technology is on board to ensure smooth motion for fast moving images.Read More

Home Entertainment

New 3D technology looks to the past to overcome the problems of present systems

With the advent of 3D glasses with polarizing filters and LCD shutters you’d be forgiven for thinking we’d seen the last of the archetypal numbers with different colored filters. Well, think again because European researchers have come up with technology they say can display 3D images at a monitor’s full resolution, with no darkening of the ambient light, no restrictions on viewing angle and with less strain on the eyes than other 3D technologies – and yes, it relies on glasses with different colored filters.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Trashed LCD TVs could fight harmful bacteria

Who would have thought television could be good for you? Researchers at the University of York in the U.K. have transformed a chemical compound found in LCD television sets into an anti-microbial substance that destroys infections such as Escherichia coli and some strains of Staphylococcus aureus. The treated polyvinyl-alcohol (PVA) could potentially also be used in tissue scaffolds to help parts of the body regenerate, pills and dressings that deliver drugs, and hospital cleaning products to prevent infection.Read More

Digital Cameras

Panvista Borescope Package lets you see inside an engine for just US$140

One the many hidden gems we stumbled over at Computex 2010, the Panvista Borescope Package consists of a tiny fiber optic video camera, joined via a long flexible tube to a 3.5 inch hand-held color LCD monitor. The camera head is equipped with four Infrared LEDs, allowing it to see in the dark. Besides other useful applications, the camera can be used to peek inside a car’s engine via the spark plug hole.Read More

Digital Cameras

New Sony projectors – brighter, greener, more flexible

Sony has released two new models in its Bright Era 3LCD business projector series - the VPL-FX500L and VPL-FX30. Both projectors have native XGA resolution of 1024 x 768, excellent lens shift capabilities, feature long-life lamps and filters and have low power consumption even with their high-brightness performance. The FX500L (7,000 ANSI lumens) is suited to large screen applications like those found in lecture halls and auditoriums, while the FX30 (4,200 ANSI lumens) has been created for midsized classrooms, boardrooms and meeting rooms.Read More

Around The Home

LG's new outdoor 55 inch LCD panel can withstand 100 degrees Celsius

Korea's LG Display has developed an LCD panel that can display clear images even when its surface temperature exceeds 100° Celsius. Normally when the surface temperature of an LCD panel exceeds 75° Celsius, part of the display turns black, requiring a separate UV-blocking film, cooling system and protective glass and entailing additional costs and electricity consumption for safe operation. The panel will be cheaper than existing panels, much brighter and can be expected to accelerate the pace of growth of the overall public information display market. Read More

    Advertisement
    Advertisement
    Advertisement

    See the stories that matter in your inbox every morning