Advertisement

Language

Science

Mapping the thesaurus of the human brain

Researchers from the University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley) have used MRI data to create what they call a "semantic atlas," using vivid colors in multiple dimensions to show how the brain organizes language. The greater understanding that the map provides could one day help patients suffering from conditions such as motor neuron diseases and strokes in making themselves understood.Read More

Science

Disney tech may lead to better dubbing of foreign films

Here's something you might not know about foreign-language films ... when they're dubbed to English, the editors don't necessarily just go with the most literal translation. Instead, they observe the actors' lip movements, then choose English dialogue that at least somewhat matches up with those. Now, a team from Disney Research Pittsburgh and the University of East Anglia has developed a system that does so automatically, and that offers a wider range of suggested alternate phrases.Read More

Computers

MIT aims to simplify web development with new language

Ur/Web is a new approach to coding for the Web set out in a white paper being presented by MIT researcher Adam Chlipala. Built on the foundations of the existing Haskell and ML code family, Ur/Web extends the Ur language to include a library of rules useful in a web development context. It has the potential to significantly streamline web development, taking the stack of technologies which make up a website and putting them all inside a single application that compiles all the required XML, JavaScript, SQL and CSS.Read More

VR

Learn Immersive teaches languages in virtual reality

The trouble with learning a foreign language is that to become fluent – or even just to be passably coherent in a reasonable timeframe – you need to be immersed in it. You need to live in a country where that language predominates. But cost or opportunity often make that infeasible. San Francisco startup Learn Immersive wants to create the next best thing. Its two-man team has built a virtual reality platform that transports you to real-world environments and helps you understand them in their native language.Read More

Wearables

Vibrating glove teaches Braille through passive haptic learning

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a glove that helps users learn to read and write Braille, all while focusing on unrelated activities. The wearable computer uses miniature vibrating motors sewn into the knuckles, and was found to assist in developing motor skills in participants without them focusing on the movement of their hands. Read More

Computers

Globr lets users chat, regardless of language

The internet has connected and flattened the world in ways previously unimaginable. Coupled with ever more seamless translation tools, it provides the ability to communicate across borders and languages. Now, a new instant messaging tool is looking to make communication for speakers of different languages even easier.Read More

    Advertisement
    Advertisement
    Advertisement

    See the stories that matter in your inbox every morning