Highlights from the 2014 LA Auto Show

Land Speed Records

Bloudhound SSC has confirmed that the first world land speed record test runs will take pl...

Having announced its intention in 2008 to attempt a new land speed world record, the Bloodhound team has now begun its 12-month countdown to the first test runs in South Africa. The milestone was marked yesterday with a test of the communications equipment at high-speed.  Read More

The Bloodhound's cockpit (Photo: Stefan Marjoram)

Unveiled at a special event in Bristol, UK, the Bloodhound land speed team showed off the cockpit that will be driver Andy Green’s "office" for his record attempt run in 2015 and 2016. Although Green holds the current world land speed record of 763 mph (1,227 km/h), the challenges in attempting to break the 1,000 mph (1,600 km/h) barrier will be significant for both pilot and the design team.  Read More

The four world record breakers at the National Motor Museum

Records are made to be broken, and the British have a habit of breaking World Land Speed Records more than anyone else. Last week, Don Wales, grandson of Sir Malcolm Campbell, opened a new multimedia exhibit entitled “Britain & For The Hell Of It” at the National Motor Museum, Beaulieu, Hampshire. Celebrating the golden age of British record breaking from the 1920s through the 1960s, it features four famous record-breaking cars as well as souvenirs and memorabilia, trophies and personal items belonging to the drivers.  Read More

Jessi Combs this week became the world's fastest woman on four wheels in the 52,000 hp Nor...

Back in 1965, Lee Breedlove set the women's land speed record on Utah’s Salt Lake Flats with an average speed of 308.51 mph (496.49 km/h) over four runs. That record stood for 48 years until this month, when Jessi Combs smashed it in her 52,000 hp North American Eagle Supersonic Speed Challenger with a speed of 392.954 mph (632.39 km/h).  Read More

The BLOODHOUND SSC hopes to reach speeds of more than 1,000 mph (1,610 km/h) in 2015 with ...

The Bloodhound Supersonic Car (SSC) team from the UK is continuing its journey towards claiming the world land speed record. After testing its rocket engine last year, the team has turned to 3D printing technology for another critical part of the high speed vehicle – a tip that, if all goes well, will be the first part of the car to break through the 1,000 mph (1,610 km/h) mark in 2015.  Read More

Today's test firing of the hybrid rocket system

A 1,000 mph (Mach 1.4, 1,600 km/h) car came a step closer to reality today when the BLOODHOUND SSC team successfully test fired the vehicle’s rocket motor system. Conducted in a hardened aircraft shelter originally designed to house Tornado fighters at Newquay Cornwall Airport, the hybrid rocket motor burned for ten seconds, generating 14,000 lbs (60 kN, 40,000 bhp) of thrust and a roar of 180 decibels.  Read More

An artist's impression of BLOODHOUND

On Wednesday, Britain’s BLOODHOUND team will take the next step in their attempt to break the land speed record when they test Europe’s largest hybrid rocket engine at the Aerohub, located at Newquay Cornwall Airport. The static test for the BLOODHOUND SSC car’s rocket system will be the largest rocket fired in Britain in 20 years and, if successful, will open the way toward building a car capable of doing 1,000 mph (Mach 1.4, 1,600 km/hr).  Read More

La Jamais Contente

Despite the coming of the electric vehicle during the last decade, there were far more electric vehicle manufacturers in the world 100 years ago than there are today. Hundreds of manufacturers, a large proportion of them electric, competed in the fledgling automotive marketplace. This competition drove these manufacturers to seek new and novel ways to seek publicity, and when a French Automobile magazine ran top speed trials in December 1898, it sparked a flurry of record attempts and six land speed records in just four months. The electric Jamais Contente, which was the first purpose-built speed record attempt car, prevailed in this early tussle by raising the land speed record to 105.878 km/h (65.79 mph) in April 1899.  Read More

The Electric Blue streamliner built by BYU students now holds the world land speed record ...

Brigham Young University (BYU) students are celebrating after setting a new land speed record for an electric car in the “E1” (under 1,100 lbs/499 kg) class. The record of 155.8 mph (250.7 km/h) set by the “Electric Blue” streamliner at the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah was averaged over the two required qualifying runs, one of which saw the car reach a speed of 175 mph (281.6 km/h). The record marks the end of a seven year quest by BYU students led by Perry Carter who, having just retired as an associate professor, gets to bow out on top.  Read More

The Buckeye Bullet team has announced plans to develop an entirely new version of its reco...

Work to design a new version of the Buckeye Bullet capable of speeds in excess of 400 mph has begun. The Ohio State University team has revealed that Version 3 is to be an entirely new battery electric vehicle featuring an optimized body and fin shape based on aerodynamic simulations undertaken at the Ohio Supercomputer Center. Other drag-reduction tweaks - such as driver position and the strategic addition of wind deflectors - are currently being considered, ahead of construction and testing during the next academic year.  Read More

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