Top 100: The most desirable cars of all time

Land Mines

The SaveOneLife system

Boot insoles can turn a pair of really uncomfortable brogues into podiatric clouds that can take a long hike and remove the foot ache. Now, Lemur Studio Design based in Bogota, Colombia, has come up with a concept for insoles that won’t just save your instep, but could save your life. A submission to the World Design Impact Prize 2013-2014 competition, SaveOneLife is a wearable mine detector that fits in a shoe and warns the wearer if and where a potentially deadly landmine might lurk nearby.  Read More

The University of Coimbra's minesweeping robot

A team from the Institute of Systems and Robotics at Portugal's University of Coimbra is developing a minesweeping robot to assist in the monumental task of clearing the millions of active land mines around the globe. Currently putting it through a series of field testings, the team is working to optimize the robot to automate the manual, and exceedingly dangerous, humanitarian de-mining effort.  Read More

A dramatic visualization of the Mine Kafon in use

An Afghan designer has come up with a novel tumbleweed-esque device to find and detonate mines, a device that has evolved from the wind-powered toys he made as a child. Massoud Hassani's Mine Kafon is made mainly from bamboo and biodegradable plastics, but the simple addition of a GPS chip means the wind-swept spheres can be monitored to reveal the location of mines.  Read More

The SAPER mobile application uses the device's embedded magnetometer to turn a smartphone ...

With unexploded ordnance and land mines remaining a serious global problem, we’ve seen many efforts to develop new technology to detect these dangers, such as using terahertz waves and inkjet-printable sensors. But instead of relying on the development of new technology, some students at the Military University of Technology in Warsaw have sought to use an existing one in a new way with the development of their SAPER explosives detection app for smartphones.  Read More

The D-3 is a robotic vehicle that uses a chain flail or tiller to detonate land mines (Pho...

According to UNICEF, there are currently over 110 million live land mines buried in the soil of various countries around the world, left over from conflicts that occurred up to 50 years ago. While various organizations are working on locating and removing those mines, it’s proving to be a long and laborious process. Instead of precisely pinpointing and then disarming each device, however, one has to wonder ... wouldn’t it be easier to just go around thumping on the ground and getting them to go off? Well, it just happens that DIGGER DTR’s hulking D-3 robotic vehicle does exactly that.  Read More

A land mine warning - a sight all to common in many parts of the world (Image: Kyle Simour...

Land mines are terrifying and indiscriminate weapons, harming soldiers and civilians alike. Even long after the conflict in which they were deployed has ceased they end up killing and injuring civilians and render land impassable and unusable for decades. There are a variety of methods used to detect mines by both humanitarian and military groups, but many are dangerous, most are less than 100 percent reliable and some of the more reliable detection methods are prohibitively expensive. Physicists have now built a relatively inexpensive land mine detection system using off-the-shelf components – including some sourced from online auction sites.  Read More

As each barrel can contain a variety of projectiles, it can fire a sensor from each of the...

Metal Storm has been granted another round of patents and one in particular has important implications for the future of minefields. The company’s weapon technology functions somewhat like an inkjet printer, using computer-controlled electronic ignition and a system of stacked projectiles in multiple barrels. As each barrel can contain a variety of projectiles, it can fire a sensor from each of the barrels to cover an area with sensors. If any sensor is triggered, the barrel to which it belongs fires a subsequent explosive projectile to the exact same point. The system offers many advantages, including the ability to be switched off leaving no explosive ordnance remaining in the area that had been protected. With landmines being one of the most dreadful and enduring legacies of war, it’s an enormous shame that only one side will be using Metal Storm, as it represents a potential solution to the deployment of this insidious device.  Read More

Not unlike a Volvo, the Oshkosh M-ATV is boxy, but it's good

The success of MRAP (Mine-Resistant, Ambush-Protected) vehicles in saving lives from IED (Improvised Explosive Device) and ambush attacks has seen the US Marine Corp scrambling to accelerate the rate of production by awarding contracts to multiple companies. Oshkosh Defense has now delivered three production-representative MRAP All Terrain Vehicles (M-ATVs) to the U.S. Army’s Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland for military evaluation.  Read More

The MineWolf - the machine with superhero aspirations

The MineWolf can best be described as a superhero – a machine which uses its unique and extraordinary strength to benefit humanity. The nearest machine we can think of is the tmsuk’s 3.5 metre tall Enryu robot which rushes into burning buildings and rescues people. The most effective demining machine, it can reclaim 30,000 square metres of land, and can run over 10 kg anti-tank mines without flinching. Like Enryu, it even has remote-control capability for really dangerous tasks, but sadly, it’s losing the war. There are 110 million landmines buried and active on Mother Earth. Another 215 million are stockpiled and ten million are produced annually. If we stop laying mines NOW and continue clearing at current rates, the world will be free of mines in the year 3100. It’s a prime example of what can happen when people use technology the wrong way.  Read More

ALMDS pod mounted on an MH-60S helicopter

March 12, 2008 A Northrop Grumman system designed to protect ships by using lasers to detect mines in the ocean has been given the go-ahead by the U.S. Navy for low-rate initial production. The US$25 million will see three Airborne Laser Mine Detection System (ALMDS) produced with expectations that 25 units will be manufactured over the next five years.  Read More

Looking for something? Search our 29,888 articles
Editor's Choice
Product Comparisons