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Kinect


— Home Entertainment

Microsoft's IllumiRoom takes gaming visuals outside the box and onto the living room

At CES in January, Microsoft Research teased its IllumiRoom concept, which involves projecting an image around a TV screen to enhance video games with additional visuals. Unfortunately, the company didn't offer much info beyond a short video that briefly showed it in action. But the team behind the project recently showed up at the CHI 2013 conference in Paris with some more in-depth details about how Illumiroom will not only expand the game screen, but completely alter the appearance of your living room. Read More
— Computers

NUIA eyeCharm turns Kinect into an eye-tracker

A lot of people are getting excited about the upcoming availability of the Tobii REX device, that adds eye-tracking capability to existing computers. If it’s any indication of what consumer prices will be, a Developer Edition is currently available for US$995. Munich-based startup 4titoo, however, is hoping that consumers might be swayed towards its $60 alternative. It’s called the NUIA eyeCharm, and it works with the user’s existing Kinect. Read More
— Computers

Kinect Fusion looks to make 3D modeling easier

It wasn’t that long ago that constructing 3D models was a painstaking and time-consuming task. These days, devices such as the Lynx A camera are turning it into a point and shoot affair. Microsoft is also doing its bit to make life easier for graphic artists, 3D printing aficionados, industrial designers, animators, architects, and games developers by turning its Kinect for Windows sensor to the task of generating 3D models of objects and environments. Read More
— Games

IllumiRoom takes video games beyond the TV

The way we play video games is forever evolving. Nintendo brought motion control to the masses with the Wii, while the rise of smartphones and tablets has meant the number of casual games (and casual gamers) has grown exponentially over the past few years. What is next on the agenda? The signs all point towards a more immersive experience being the main aim and Microsoft Research is keen to lead the way with IllumiRoom. Read More
— Music

Springy spandex is main ingredient in interactive performance concept

Invented in 1959, the extremely elastic synthetic fiber spandex can be found in cycling shorts and other figure-hugging sportswear. It's also made its way into home furnishings and served as a leave-nothing-to-the-imagination 70s rock god favorite. Now, it has well-and-truly entered the digital age with the creation of Firewall, an interactive performance wall that alters the speed, volume or intensity of music in response to a user pressing into its membrane, while also showing off some eye-popping, user-reactive visuals. Read More
— Games

Microsoft wants to turn your living room into a holodeck

Microsoft is beginning to emerge from what some have called "the missing decade" as a company eager to innovate and forge the future rather than be dragged along into it by its competitors. The Xbox brand is very much part of popular culture, and the Xbox 360 is expected to be superseded by a successor in 2013. But Microsoft is looking even further forward than that, with a recently revealed patent application suggesting the company wants to turn living rooms into something akin to the holodecks featured in Star Trek. Read More
— Automotive

Nissan to roll out Microsoft Kinect-powered virtual showrooms across the U.S.

A recent study of auto consumers performed by Maritz Research revealed that, despite the auto industry's growing use of social media and websites, the salesperson is still the most valuable source of car information for consumers. Nissan customers may soon sing a different tune with news the automaker is launching a new dealership feature based on Microsoft Kinect hardware and software that will allow customers to perform a virtual inspection of a given vehicle – even when the vehicle hasn't yet rolled off the assembly line. Read More
— Around The Home

Garbage-seeking waste basket moves to catch any trash thrown at it

We've all done it: you toss a piece of trash at a nearby waste basket only to have it ricochet off the edge, forcing you to make that shameful walk to go pick it up and drop it in carefully. You only have your own hand-eye coordination skills to blame, but if you think about it, shouldn't catching trash be the garbage can's job? That certainly seems to be the thought process that led one Japanese inventor to construct a smart trash can that tracks garbage tossed in its general direction and then moves across the floor to catch it. Read More
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